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LabourList readers believe that Labour should supp

first_imgLabourList readers believe that Labour should support the further use of ‘stop and search‘ in response to the rise in knife crime, our latest survey has found.A majority of almost 56% of respondents said they backed the use of ‘stop and search’ police powers, excluding ‘don’t know’ answers. With ‘don’t know’ replies included, nearly 46% approved, 36% didn’t and 18% weren’t sure.Coming after a week of knife crime dominating the news and politics due to a recent spike, the results indicate that readers are divided on the right approach to violent crime.But they also suggest that criticism of ‘stop and search’ powers from top party figures such as Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott have not cut through. This could be because Labour has not advanced such arguments recently, choosing to focus instead on cuts to police numbers.Last week, the Equalities and Human Rights Commission said it was looking into complaints about Labour’s handling of antisemitism cases and believed the party “may have unlawfully discriminated against people because of their ethnicity and religious beliefs”.Baroness Sayeeda Warsi, a former Tory chair, also called for a “full independent inquiry” into Islamophobia in her party as senior Conservative MPs denied there was a problem.The survey found that LabourList readers believe the Labour Party is not institutionally antisemitic – but that the Conservative Party is institutionally Islamophobic.An overwhelming 70% of readers said Labour’s antisemitism problem was not ‘institutional, while over 60% of 4,165 respondents said the Tories had an institutional Islamophobia problem.If both Theresa May’s deal deal and ‘no deal’ are rejected by the Commons this week, as is likely, the Prime Minister has pledge to offer a vote to parliamentarians on extending Article 50.Asked whether MPs should in favour of delaying Brexit, a very large majority of respondents – 81.5% – said ‘yes’. Just 14% said they shouldn’t, and over 4% were not certain.1. Do you believe that the Labour Party is institutionally antisemitic?Click to enlarge.No – 70.2% (2,939)Yes – 20.6% (864)Don’t know – 9.0% (379)2. Do you believe that the Conservative Party is institutionally Islamophobic?Click to enlarge.Yes – 60.1% (2,504)No – 21.6% (900)Don’t know – 18.2% (761)3. If both Theresa May’s deal and ‘no deal’ are defeated next week, the Prime Minister has promised to give MPs a vote on Article 50 extension. Should MPs vote to extend Article 50, which would delay Brexit?Click to enlarge.Yes – 81.5% (3,387)No – 14.2% (593)Don’t know – 4.2% (175)4. Do you believe that Labour should support the further use of ‘stop and search’ in response to the rise in knife crime?Click to enlarge.Yes – 45.7% (1,889)No – 36.1% (1,491)Don’t know – 18.1% (748)The survey was open from 9am on Friday 8th March until 8pm on Sunday 10th March. Thank you to all 4,188 readers who took part.Tags:Labour /Stop and search /Weekly Survey /Antisemitism /Islamophobia /Brexit delay /last_img read more

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Another appeal another deal — but activists are frustrated

first_imgAnother project has gotten the go-ahead following mediation between developer and activists by Supervisor Hillary Ronen and her staff. The project, 1726 Mission Street, plans to turn a former sausage factory near Duboce Avenue  into 40 units of housing with a commercial ground floor. The activist group Our Mission No Eviction then appealed the project’s approval, putting it up for a vote at the Board of Supervisors.Rather than ask the Board to take an up-or-down vote on the project, however, Ronen was able to mediate the talks until the parties came to an agreement: The sponsor of the project, the LLC Sustainable Living and its managing member John Dennis, will make one more of the 40 units in the proposed building available for sale at below market rate. That brings the total number of units in the building deemed affordable from seven to eight, or 20 percent. Sustainable Living also agreed to lease the ground-floor space for light industrial purposes — often called Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR) — at below market rate for 10 years. There will also be a mural painted on the site visible to the street. With the appeal withdrawn, the Board of Supervisors voted unanimously last Tuesday to affirm the project’s approvals. Ronen has made a habit of stepping in as a mediator, sealing deals at 1515 South Van Ness Ave., 2675 Folsom St. and, more recently, 1850 Bryant St.As Scott Weaver, an attorney and tenants rights activist who brought the appeal, said: “She gets the job done.”Ronen has told Mission Local in the past that “I can’t imagine a better use of my time as a district supervisor.”Her staff, it seems, is also playing a key role. Legislative aide Amy Beinart joined the staff about a month ago with a focus on land use and housing, and jumped into the 1726 Mission St. negotiation. Beinart said these deals hinge on both parties being willing to budge, but also to focus on specific goals to move toward. “The goal is for people to focus on what they’re able to achieve, to look at realistic circumstances and to walk into it with an open mind and a good spirit,” she said. “Some of these kinds of mediations move forward and some don’t.”In this case, Beinart said, the developer was willing to share his finances for the project and illustrate candidly where compromises could be made.It’s unclear which project will be the next to avoid an appeal. At the moment, Ronen’s office is monitoring the progress of several completely below-market-rate buildings — 1950 Mission St. (the site of a current Navigation Center) and 490 South Van Ness Ave. are among them.But with dozens of market-rate developments also proposed around the Mission, activists are likely to keep the pressure on developers to provide more community benefits.In fact, Weaver, though he admitted Ronen’s office has been efficient, is far from satisfied with the result of the negotiation. The deal was “the best we could get” without having to take on the expenses of pursuing opposition all the way through the Board of Supervisors appeal process, and then suing the developer if the appeal had failed with the Board, Weaver said. “We’re not happy about it,” he said. Still — “It’s a small project. It’s only 40 units. So it’s hard to get really upset about it … But, you know, it seems like we’re giving a lot of ground.”Some might consider 20 percent affordability, which is more than the roughly 17 percent minimum that was originally required by the city, a success — especially on a relatively small project. Weaver and other activists, however, measure in terms of the proportion of new buildings that will be rented or sold at market rate. The lost ground, then, is this project clocking in at five percent more market rate units proportionally than 1515 South Van Ness Ave. and 2675 Folsom St., two other projects approved after a deal was made.“The community is losing more than it’s gaining, and I think that’s the source of a great deal of frustration,” Weaver said. He said it won’t take very much longer before neighborhood activists decide to go whole hog and take a developer to court for, say, being out of compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act.“I don’t know when is going to be the breaking point where people will say, ‘that’s it,’ but I don’t think it’s too far away just judging from people’s frustration,” Weaver said. “At some point, we’re just going to have to say, ‘enough is enough.’”One group has already been projecting that message: The Plaza 16 Coalition, a vocal opponent of the 1979 Mission Project at 16th Street, has repeatedly vowed to reject any proposal on that site that is not entirely below-market-rate. A hearing date has not been set for the project, but opponents have already made a request to the Planning Commission that its hearing be held in the Mission District. It’s unclear whether that request will be granted. 0%center_img Tags: development • housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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SF Mission District politicians stand behind Leno

first_imgTo tackle housing and the homelessness crises, Leno pledged to build and refurbish 5,000 low-income, moderate-income, and supportive housing units each year. He also said he would make sure the budget includes additional funds to end city homelessness by 2020. A crowd of mostly Leno supporters waved signs bearing his name and cheered as he made his pledges. Some passersby stopped to listen, while others approached him during his speech. “Are you a Democrat or a Republican?” asked an older lady with a basket in tow. “I’m a Democrat!” replied Leno as the lady walked away. David Campos, now the chair of the San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee, said he is casting his first vote for Leno in the election’s ranked-choice voting system. He echoed Ronen in calling Leno’s plans “detailed and realistic.” “Not enough to talk about change; you have to deliver on that change,” he said.Campos said that Leno is the Central Committee’s first choice and Kim, he said, is the committee’s second choice. Ronen, too, has endorsed both candidates, although not in any particular order, saying only that they both would be excellent and have “different strengths.” As Mission Local reported in March, both Leno and District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim are focusing resources in District 9. Kim has a field office on Mission Street, Leno’s is not far away in the Castro, and both appeal to the area’s working-class, progressive politics. Recently, however,  Board of Supervisors President London Breed’s campaign has become more active in the district. Breed signs are popping up in merchant windows along the district’s main drags. And Breed, who has been conspicuously absent from many mayoral forums, attended the SF Latino Forum last week in the Mission. On Thursday, Campos took a shot at Breed for heading a Board of Supervisors that worked with Ed Lee “to roll out the red carpet for corporate entities without anything in return.” He mentioned the Twitter tax break, as well as now-state Assemblyman David Chiu’s legislation that “legalized Airbnb without any metrics for how (the company) could be a socially responsible entity in the city.” The statements, perhaps, served as a knock at Kim as well, since she supported both laws. A poll released Thursday has Leno and Breed virtually tied for the lead — Leno at 28 percent and Breed at 27 percent — with Kim in third at 17 percent, Angela Alioto at 6 percent, and all other candidates at 12 percent. Nine percent of voters are undecided, according to the poll. It’s unclear, however, if the poll means anything, aside from the fact that the race is tight.  As evidenced by the candidates’ ramped up presence in the neighborhood, this cycle appears to be the first time in a while that the Mission District is in competition. In 2011, when Ed Lee made his successful first-term run for mayor, it was the progressive District 11 Supervisor John Avalos who won the district’s vote by a landslide. Leno said after his speech that the Mission was especially important to him because it is “not only the epicenter of the affordability crisis, but also the poster child for unbridled change and growth.” “It does reflect all that San Francisco is dealing with,” he said. Past and present Mission District representatives are doubling down on their support for mayoral hopeful Mark Leno. Indeed, unlike recent past mayoral elections, the Mission District appears to be in play. On Thursday morning, standing beside District 9 Supervisor Hillary Ronen and her predecessor David Campos at the 24th Street BART plaza, Leno trumpeted his plans for small business, housing and homelessness — issues he believes deeply affect the Mission. “I’m so proud to be standing here in my district, supporting Mark Leno for the next mayor of San Francisco,” Ronen said.She emphasized that Leno’s legislative history and plans for housing, homelessness, street sanitation and crime are among the most realistic and detailed in the field of candidates. 0%center_img Tags: crime • Elections • homelessness • housing • Mark Leno • Mayor • politics Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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SAINTS lost 1625 to Wakefield Trinity Wildcats in

first_imgSAINTS lost 16-25 to Wakefield Trinity Wildcats in the Reserve Championship on Friday.Although the scores were tied 12 apiece at half time, Wakefield upped the ante in the second and Saints had no answer.Match Summary:Saints:Tries: Wheeler, Percival, YatesGoals: Foster (2)Wildcats: Tries: Wright (2), Walshaw, FletcherGoals: Graystone (4)Drop: AnsellHalf time: 12-12Full time: 16-25Teams:Saints:Swift; Sandford, Foster, Wheeler, Percival (pictured); Gaskell, Yates; Hand, Speakman, Walker, Hale, Clare, Jones.Subs: McCloskey, Lloyd, Tilley, AsheWakefield:Grayson; Morton, Kay, Walshaw, Fletcher; Hyde, Ansell; Lillycrop, Wright, Johnson, Slater, Annahin, Trout.Lowther, Tate, Joynt, Gledhilllast_img read more

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Man pleads to trafficking heroin and promoting prostitution charges

first_img Detectives with the New Hanover Sheriff’s Office received information from the Raleigh Police Department that Gantt had traveled from Raleigh and was posting advertisements for prostitution services available in Wilmington.Gantt solicited men online to engage in prostitution services with a 29-year-old female at the Budgetel Inn located at 4903 Market Street.After the criminal investigation, detectives discovered more than eight grams of heroin concealed within the folds of Gantt’s stomach and crotch area.Related Article: NC officer released from hospital more than 3 months after shootingGantt was sentenced up to 8 years in prison for his charges. David Julian Gantt (Photo: New Hanover Co. DA’s Office) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A Wake County man pleaded guilty for trafficking heroin and promoting prostitution charges.David Julian Gantt, 28, was charged with two counts of Trafficking in Heroin, PWIMSD a Schedule IV Controlled Substance and two counts of Promoting Prostitution.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Man charged with hit and run is an illegal immigrant

first_img He turned himself in to Wilmington police, but it was revealed he is an illegal immigrant and ICE agents have “an interest in him.”He will be electronically monitored for the time being. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The man accused of crashing into an Ashley High School student’s car and leaving the scene was in court today for a hit and run. Now, immigration is interested in him.25-year-old Jose Heredia-Martinez was charged with felony hit and run with injury, misdemeanor hit and run with property damage, no operators license and failure to reduce speed to avoid a collision.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Teacher fired following allegations of sex crimes with students

first_imgMichael Kelly (Photo: New Hanover Co. Sheriff’s Office) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The New Hanover County School Board has decided to fired Isaac Bear Early College High School teacher Michael Kelly who accused of sex crimes with students.Members went into closed session this evening. When they returned they approved a resolution to dismiss Kelly from his duties.- Advertisement – The board said they were appalled with Kelly’s alleged actions.“We need to make sure that people understand that we will not tolerate any activity by anybody that would tend to harm our children,” said board chairman Ed Higgins.Kelly, 48, was arrested back in February. He faces a total of 32 child sex crime charges involving a dozen alleged victims.Related Article: Police: Man tried to pay for McDonald’s with bag of weedRELATED: Crimes involving local teacher allegedly happened on school campusWarrants reveal more details about the alleged crimes.Among the accusations in the arrest warrants is that Kelly performed oral sex on a boy while recording it. He is also accused of showing five teens a picture of another teen naked.A New Hanover County Schools spokesperson says Kelly was suspended without pay on February 7. Superintendent Dr. Tim Markley also started proceedings to dismiss Kelly that day.If Kelly makes bond, he is forbidden to contact the victims or their families, can not be on school grounds, and must not be in the presence of any minor without direct supervision.The prosecutor said Kelly is expected to be indicted before his next court appearance, which is on June 7.He is in the New Hanover County Detention Center under a $1.5 million bond.last_img read more

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NC incident management team returns home from Hawaii

first_img The team has been helping plan and coordinate evacuations as well as assisting with shelters as Mount Kilauea continues erupting lava from open fissures.The new team is made up of eight county emergency managers including Major Donald Taft with the New Hanover Sheriff’s Office.The assignment for this new team in Hawaii will last for two weeks. Lava spattering in Hawaii (Photo: USGS) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Members of a North Carolina incident management team who have been serving in Hawaii since May 19 returned home this weekend.Another team from North Carolina has replaced them to assist the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency in staffing its emergency operations center on a 24-hour basis.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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UNCW to host 4th Annual Cape Fear Minority Enterprise Development Week

first_img00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – Starting a new business can be a rewarding adventure but the ultimate key to success is getting the right kind of business development support to help guide you through the tough times.The 4th Annual Cape Fear Regional Minority Enterprise Week gets underway at UNCW on Wednesday, Oct. 24 and Thursday, Oct. 25.- Advertisement – “It’s an opportunity for small, minority business owners to learn how to grow their business and interact with vendors and learn about government contracts,” said Dr. Kent Guion, Chief Diversity Officer at UNCW.Currently, there are 183,000 minority-owned businesses across North Carolina which generate an estimated $16.1 billion in revenue annually.“It’s one of the fastest growing sectors of our economy in North Carolina and nationwide,” said Guion.Related Article: US hiring slower but steady as employers add 155K jobsIn North Carolina, alone, those businesses provide about 261,000 jobs.While the aim for this conference is small, minority-owned businesses, Guion says everyone has the opportunity to learn and grow their business.“One of the most fruitful parts of the events is networking opportunities,” he added.Event organizers have invited a number of speakers to take part in the two-day event.“So many other entrepreneurs want to give back and this is a way for them to talk about their journey and give real-life information about how to grow smaller businesses,” Guion said.Attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in a vendor fair.The 4th Annual Cape Fear Region Minority Enterprise Week will be held Oct. 24 & 25 at the UNCW Burney Center. Admission is free.last_img read more

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