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‘Vehicle for corruption’ speeding forward – Opposition Leader

first_img…as plans to sell-off sugar assets without valuations startExpressions of interest have been invited by the Special Purpose Unit, tasked with the divestment of assets of the sugar industry, via advertisements in the local dailies. And the “vehicle for corruption” – as dubbed by Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo – has put not only Skeldon, Rose Hall and the Enmore factories on the chopping block, but have also included the Wales Estate.The Wales Sugar EstateAt his last news conference, Jagdeo made clear that established procedures for the divestment of State assets are being ignored. He explained that the structure included a unit staffed by technical personnel, who reported to the Privatisation Board, composed of representatives of the labour movement, the Private Sector and consumers – who then made recommendations to the Cabinet on privatisation undertakings.More worrying, according to him, is the absence of valuations of the assets put on the chopping block by the A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) Special Purpose Unit. “Deals will be made there with no valuation of the assets and one day we wake up and all of it is gone… this means it will go from the Special Purpose Unit to a few Ministers and then to a buyer without valuation…. how can you sell an asset without doing a valuation… this Special Purpose Unit is a vehicle for corruption,” Jagdeo said.Wales EstateOn the issue of the Wales Estate, the APNU/AFC Government announced the closure of the estate. It then indicated that there would be diversification efforts at the estate, which has not happened. Now Wales is on the chopping block, as indicated by the advertisement.The APNU/AFC has presented no detailed plan to address the state or future of the sugar industry, other than an eight-page ‘State Paper’ – of which, four and a half pages deals with the history of the sugar industry in Guyana. The remaining pages briefly details plans for merger of sugar estates, the Guyana Sugar Corporation’s recovery of drainage and irrigation costs from the Government of Guyana and plans for divestment.Government’s own Commission of Inquiry, which recommended the non-closure of sugar estates, has also been ignored.Still opposedMeanwhile, the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU) – the largest body representing sugar workers – has indicated that it plans to approach the courts to prevent the sale of the sugar industry’s assets and also endeavours to prevent the closure of more sugar estate; the Wales Estate being the first to go.GAWU President, Komal Chand, told this publication that there is an opportunity and willingness for stakeholders to come together and resolve issues perceived as problems, particularly given that there are solutions that could be worked out in the best interest of the sugar workers and the country as a whole.Unnamed partnerAdditionally, the advertisement also noted that the Special Purpose Unit is “partnering with international professional financial services firm to provide technical and financial advisory support” – in an effort to ensure transparency. However, the firm is not named.Notably, the Special Purpose Unit is operating with a multimillion-dollar budget. A whopping $130 million was approved by Government majority on July 7, 2017 for the Unit.The details on the ‘Special Purpose Unit’, which is included in the Financial Paper, states that the Unit will need the monies for the “provision of employment costs, utilities, professional and legal fees, advertisements, office space, operating supplies, furniture and equipment.”The Unit is tasked with the divestment (sell-off) of assets owned by the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo).The advertisement makes clear that the Unit is acting on behalf of the Government of Guyana and the letters of interest would be a first step in the process of “finding/shortlisting interested individuals or entities of all construct with an interest in any one of, combination of, or the group of estates/factories mentioned”. November 3, 2017, is the listed deadline for persons or companies, individually or part of a joint venture/consortium or independent developers to express interest.last_img read more

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Half-time: West Ham 3 Fulham 0

first_imgAndy Carroll made an immediate impact for West Ham, who are in complete control at Upton Park.Carroll, signed on loan from Liverpool, played a pivotal role in his new team going ahead after only 54 seconds.Ricardo Vaz Te collected the England striker’s flick and laid the ball across to an unmarked Kevin Nolan, who fired into the corner of the net.Kieran Richardson, making his Fulham debut following a move from Sunderland, brought a save from keeper Jussi Jaaskelainen with a long-range effort, before West Ham almost doubled their lead.Again Carroll was in the thick of the action, this time nodding down to Mohamed Diame, who smashed a shot against the bar.Keeper Mark Schwarzer produced a near-post save to deny Vaz Te, but was unable to rescue Fulham when Mahamadou Diarra allowed Winston Reid to get in front of him and head home Matt Taylor’s 29th-minute corner.Taylor then added the third, rifling in the loose ball after Brede Hangeland had partially cleared another high ball towards Carroll.New signing Dimitar Berbatov is among Fulham’s substitutes.Click here for the Fulham v West Ham quizFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Global award for Radebe

first_imgThe stylish and extremely well-connected Bridgette Radebe is the Global Foundation for Democracy’s Businesspersonof the Year. (Image: Mining Weekly)Janine ErasmusThe Global Foundation for Democracy honoured South African mining entrepreneur Bridgette Radebe, the country’s first woman to excel in this sector, as their 2008 Businessperson of the Year at a function in Johannesburg in May 2008.Radebe, who is the sister of billionaire Patrice Motsepe, himself a renowned gold mining magnate and one of the world’s wealthiest men, is married to Jeff Radebe, South Africa’s minister of transport. She is recognised as one of South Africa’s most powerful businesspeople and to date is the only woman at the helm of a deep mining company.The well-connected Radebe received her award from Kazakh billionaire Alexander Mashkevich, whose company Alferon Management has mining operations in several countries, a number of them in Africa.The citation for Radebe’s award describes her as a “heroic women and a born entrepreneur who defied legislation to build her own successful mining group. She is an economic activist, an agent of transformation and a pioneer of change who has played a key role in changing exclusionary mining legislation in South Africa and who pioneered the implementation of empowerment mining models in Africa and internationally.”The mission of the Global Foundation for Democracy is to educate the public about the benefits of using democracy as a means of achieving global peace and cooperation. The award is presented to individuals who have made a difference in an ever-changing political and environmental landscape. Among its past winners is former South African president FW de Klerk, who jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 with another former president, Nelson Mandela.Determined to forge ahead in the mining sectorRadebe heads the Mmakau Mining company, which besides its core business has shares in numerous other enterprises. Mmakau focuses on gold, platinum and coal mining. It is named after the village in North West Province where Radebe grew up, and it was the exploitation of her people’s mineral rights that determined her choice of career. Mmakau was established as a company in 1995 after Radebe had gained considerable experience as a mining contractor.It wasn’t long before the company took on ownership of its own mines and entered into a partnership with Shaft Sinkers, broadening its scope to include shaft sinking, and mining design and construction. Today Mmakau has a 7% share in Marula Platinum, a 30% share in Madibeng Platinum, a 25% share in Shaft Sinkers, and a 25% share in Dorstfontein coal mine, among several others. It has also diversified into ferrochrome with a 6,5% stake in the Hernic ferrochrome plant near Brits.A pioneer of women in businessRadebe is a political science graduate who obtained her BA degree from the University of Botswana. In 2003 she founded the New Africa Mining Fund, a private equity fund that focuses on investing in junior mining opportunities in South Africa and the broader Africa continent. To date the fund has invested in a range of mining-related resources including gold, kaolin, coal, diamonds, anthracite, silica and platinum.With her considerable experience in the mining sector, Radebe played an important role in the South African Mineral & Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA) of 2002, which provides for equitable access to and sustainable development of the nation’s vast mineral and petroleum resources. She also had a hand in the creation of the Mining Charter and is credited with ensuring that the charter not only contains empowerment quotas but also a target for gender empowerment.In addition to her many mining interests, Radebe sits on the board of Sappi, South Africa’s major paper producer. Previously she served on the board of the National Research Foundation.Radebe was the first president of the local branch of the International Women’s Forum, a global network of women leaders whose members include US Senator Hillary Clinton, South Africa’s First Lady Zanele Mbeki and former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher. The South African chapter was established in 2000.Radebe also chairs the South African Mining Development Association and in 2007 was appointed as vice chair of the Minerals and Mining Development Board that advises the Minister of Minerals and Energy on matters that relate to the MPRDA, as well as dispute resolution and human resource development in the sector. She will serve a three-year term in this position.“We continue to forge links between South Africa and mining investors on the African continent,” said Radebe, speaking recently in her capacity as the chair of the Mining Development Association. “Our business commitment is to pursue a code of conduct in Africa that will demonstrate global mining transformation policies in these countries. The next ten years in the history of the South African mining economy will give rise to defining moments in the long walk to economic freedom.”Useful linksDepartment of Minerals and EnergyGlobal Foundation for DemocracyNew Africa Mining FundSouth African Women in Mining AssociationSA Mining Development AssociationInspirational Women at Worklast_img read more

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Finding strength through breast cancer

first_imgMandy Winter, single mother of two and breast cancer survivor. To date, PinkDrive has educated 39 226 women, provided 30 467 clinical breast examinations and done 4 203 free mammograms.(Images: Mandy Winter)MEDIA CONTACTS • Mandy Winter +27 11 699 1881Cadine PillayThe PinkDrive is an ongoing initiative dedicated to breast cancer, which powers mobile mammography and education units for women across South Africa, while promoting awareness. Through its mobile services, single mother of two, Mandy Winter, discovered she had breast cancer three years ago in October – the designated month for breast cancer awareness.Winter (43) was diagnosed with breast cancer after an assessment in the PinkDrive mammography truck at the end of October 2009. After several consultation visits, she was then given a choice by her surgeon to have either a lumpectomy and chemotherapy or a mastectomy.Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. According to the South African National Cancer Registry, one in 29 South African women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. The statistics on breast cancer in South Africa are a growing concern, but this can be addressed through more education and access to facilities.Taking immediate actionWinter said she had a very good diagnosis of stage one breast cancer and was told that she was lucky the cancer was detected early, as the lump was small.“Working with the disease and with a bit of inside information, I chose to have a double mastectomy as I did not want to take the chance of it coming back in my other breast,” Winter says.Winter decided to have immediate reconstruction, which involved having tissue expanders implanted at the same time as the mastectomy. “I was told by my oncologist that I did not really need the chemo but they were doing it as a precautionary measure.”Winter finished her chemotherapy in March 2010 and her results were clear. Thereafter she was put on the oestrogen blocker Tamoxifen, as the cancer was oestrogen receptive.Reliving the nightmareSadly, because of incorrect chemotherapy, says Winter, the cancer was back in less than a year. “My diagnosis was two to three years to live if I redid the chemo.”This was in April 2011.  The thought of going through chemotherapy for a second time was devastating to Winter and the oncologist she was assigned to was callous and unsympathetic, she says.Winter went for a second opinion and the prognosis was much the same, but delivered with compassion and a positive outlook. “The second oncologist never gave me a death sentence, as was the case with the first oncologist, and was willing to try everything,” she says.Winter did not limit her resources to modern medication and treatments, but she also tried a different approach, that of a lifestyle change.“I decided to try everything that was available to me which included living a life of fun and laughter, and faith in God, which is the only thing that can get you through such devastating circumstances,” she firmly states.Realising your strength“You never know how strong you are, until being strong is the only choice you have,” says Winter, describing her journey with breast cancer.“Cancer has taught me to appreciate all the things in life that we so often take for granted. Being positive and smiling and laughing through one’s circumstances is the only way – the mind is the most powerful tool we have.“Dealing with cancer for me was 95% mental and 5% physical,” she says.Winter went on to have six sessions of chemotherapy, finishing them at the end of October 2011 – just in time for that year’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and exactly two years after first being diagnosed through PinkDrive.“I have just had my PET [positron emission tomography] scan and I am cancer free,” she says proudly.Like many cancer survivors, Winter has now dedicated her life to the cause that saved her life, and works with PinkDrive as the manager for its Shop 4 Cancer cause. Many of the items in the shop are handmade by Winter herself, who previously ran her own successful jewellery and craft shop.The Shop 4 Cancer raises funds for the PinkDrive mobile breast check units through sales of its items.A moving causeThere is a colossal need for early detection, which is why PinkDrive keeps its trucks on the road constantly. To date, PinkDrive has educated 39 226 women, provided 30 467 clinical breast examinations and done 4 203 free mammograms.The PinkDrive mobile unit offers affordable mammography services to women in the corporate sector, and also provides free scanning and breast cancer education to women in disadvantaged communities via the local clinics or hospitals without oncology facilities.The PinkDrive trucks currently have two mobile breast units, an education unit working in some 80 community health centres in Gauteng, and a mammography unit, which operates at three community health centres in the Cape Town area, under the Tygerberg Hospital jurisdiction. PinkDrive also collaborates with other cancer NGOs to increase the overall reach for cancer education and awareness.The PinkDrive corporate wellness days provide employers with the resources to address risks proactively by developing a healthcare and corporate wellness strategy for their staff, that includes educational and personalised breast health screenings.last_img read more

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Asian Games: Sarita Devi loses controversial bout, settles for bronze

first_imgSarita DeviIndian boxer L. Sarita Devi lost her semi-final bout in controversial circumstances and had to be content with the bronze medal in the women’s light weight (57-60kg) event of the 17th Asian Games here on Tuesday.The 32-year-old Indian lost 0-3 in an unanimous decision to South Korea’s Jina Park at the Seonhak Gymnasium.After losing the first round convincingly, Sarita came back strongly in the next.Judges B and C of Italy and Poland awarded the round 10-9 to the Indian, however, Judge A of Tunisia gave it 10-9 to the South Korean.The controversy, though, took place in the third round as the Indian battered Park and had her reeling, but, inexplicably, Judges B and C awarded the round 10-9 in favour of the host fighter while Judge A gave the round 10-9 to Sarita.The fourth and decisive round was also a close fought affair with nothing to separate the two but all three judges awarded the round 10-9 to the South Korean that sealed her passage to the final of the weight category.Sarita Devi was visibly distressed by the judges’ decision and waited for a while before exiting the ring.According to reports, India are mulling an appeal against the verdict.last_img read more

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Webbing a champion’s tale

first_imgRejection and distress are two words synonymous to the life of Dola Gorai, mother of 14-year-old para swimmer Anamika Gorai.Dola recalls the day back in 2013, when she visited a hospital in Bengaluru for her daughter, who’s suffering from Upper Motor Neuron Syndrome (UMNS) a disease that has left her disabled by arms and legs since birth.A disease so fatal that it restricts Anamika’s life to the age of 22-24 if left untreated, Dola’s visit to that hospital in South India was a trip to nightmare.”The doctors at first shooed us away. Later, they told us there was no treatment to Anamika’s condition,” she tells Mail Today.In fact, the rather uncanny response to Dola’s plea is a usual scenario. Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, name any other metropolitan city in the country, Dola will tell you she has faced rejection there.Working at a cake shop in Durgapur doesn’t give her wings to dream of taking her daughter to Germany for treatment. In spite of being supported by husband Joy Gorai a local guitarist making ends meet is a routine task, let alone fancy a trip to Europe.”We are a middle-class family and thinking about going abroad for treatment is just a dream which we know is not possible right now. I know how we have survived so far and what struggles we faced in life. While we hope things get better in future, I think all we do is keep our faith in God,” she explains.It was right at that moment when a number of rejections from doctors across the country led to the Gorai family discovering the world of sport.As destiny may have it, what started as a physiotherapy routine to help making things better for the time being, unearthed Anamika’s natural talent in swimming. It was not long before the 14-year-old made her mark on the global stage.advertisement”A friend suggested us swimming and we started it when she was just six. I learnt swimming at first and started training her before we met Prasanta Karmakar who shaped her career there on. Nothing makes me happy than seeing my daughter smile again. It’s hard to live with the fact that Anamika is suffering from such a rare case condition. I feel gutted when I talk about it and we have full faith that swimming is the solution to all our problems,” says Dola, who will accompany Anamika at the 2018 Para Asian Games in Indonesia this month.Swimming came naturally to Anamika and she lived up to the flair right from the start. Soon after winning the state championship, the 14-year-old became the national champion in 2014 and repeated the feat in 2017 winning three gold medals on a trot.For the Para Asiad, Anamika qualified in some style. She won six medals at the IDM Swimming Championships in Berlin in July, including a gold medal in 150m Individual Medley (Group B). She participates in the S4 category and is also the Asian No. 1 in 50m freestyle.The cherry on top is that Anamika has also qualified for the 2019 World Para Swimming Championships in the 50m Backstroke event.All these achievements are just memoirs compared to the real competition Anamika is fighting for her life. Being face-to-face with reality, mother Dola’s only dream is to see her daughter win a gold medal on the big stage. She wants the world to remember Anamika as a true fighter. This, if the world could see the talented 14-year-old para swimmer no longer.”I don’t have words to describe how it feels. Before, god forbid, anything happens to my child, I want her to win a gold for the country and make us proud. I want her to make the whole country proud and people should remember who she was!” says Dola.For the soft-spoken Anamika, the focus is just on the Asian Games not to forget an eye on the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics.”I have a bit pressure to deliver as I have had a good season. I just want to win a gold medal if possible and hope to give my best. I just want to think about the Asian Games now, nothing else matters,” Anamika sums up.last_img read more

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San Diego County Supervisor Dianne Jacob opposes power shutoffs during wildfires

first_imgGoing on @KUSINews in a moment to talk about SDG&E power shutoffs during heightened fire risks. Pulling the plug on rural communities and first-responders is not the answer.— Dianne Jacob (@dianne_jacob) May 17, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – California is turning to electricity shutoffs to prevent wildfires.San Diego County Supervisor Dianne Jacob joined us in studio on Good Morning San Diego to discuss public safety and why she believes power shutoffs are not the answer.She said that among the 10 most destructive fires in California history, four have been caused by the major utility companies. Including the 2018 Camp Fire in Paradise and the SDG&E-caused 2007 Witch Creek Fire in San Diego County.Jacob explained by shutting off electricity, SDG&E is trying to cover itself for its failure to fully harden their rural power lines and other infrastructure. Jacob then said the fact that SDG&E is still working on hardening their infrastructure, more than a decade after its equipment caused some of our biggest fires, is outrageous.Jacob is concerned that cutting off power will hurt rural residents and impact public safety. She pointed out that a lot of older residents need power in order to run medical devices, while many families need electricity to operate water wells. Posted: May 17, 2019 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom Updated: 11:09 AM May 17, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, San Diego County Supervisor Dianne Jacob opposes power shutoffs during wildfireslast_img read more

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