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Episcopal bishops bring church’s calls for gun reform to congressional…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls By David PaulsenPosted Feb 28, 2019 Gun Violence Rector Albany, NY Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishops United Against Gun Violence, Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal bishops bring church’s calls for gun reform to congressional visits on Capitol Hillcenter_img Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Faith & Politics, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Jack Cobb of the Office of Government Relations leads a group of bishops that include retired Connecticut Bishop Suffragan Jim Curry, Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe and Washington Assisting Bishop Chilton Knudsen. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] It was the best of days and the worst of days for eight Episcopal bishops to be on Capitol Hill pressing lawmakers to pass new gun safety measures.Much of the oxygen in the nation’s capital on Feb. 27 was being sucked up by the daylong testimony of President Donald Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, his face on TVs all over Capitol Hill as he called his old boss a racist, a conman and a cheat. But beyond the day’s top political story, an unrelated House vote provided a timely backdrop for the bishops’ advocacy.The bill, known as H.R. 8, would expand background checks for gun purchases, one of the reforms that Bishops United Against Gun Violence points to as a common-sense measure with widespread support, despite the well-funded opposition of gun rights groups like the National Rifle Association.“Silence on this is complicity,” Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas told Episcopal News Service during a break in the day’s schedule of meetings with lawmakers and their staffs. “If we’re silent, other people can frame the discourse.”Bishops United is a network of about 80 Episcopal bishops that formed in the wake of the 2012 massacre of 26 children and educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Douglas, one of the conveners, still carries with him the memory of that horrific day and its grim aftermath – part of the personal narrative he shares on Capitol Hill to help frame the discourse – though the tragically long list of mass shootings since Sandy Hook supplies the bishops with ample additional examples when calling for legislative action.The bishops’ day kicked off at 9 a.m. with a closed-door presentation on the pending legislation by Rep. Bobby Scott, a Virginia Democrat, in a conference room at the United Methodist Building across the street from the Capitol.Rep @BobbyScott to members of Bishops United: Thank you for what you do. It’s important. Thank you for telling us about the people you represent. #BishopsOnTheHill #EpiscopalAdvocacy pic.twitter.com/iaiGA8nqAV— The Cross Lobby (@TheCrossLobby) February 27, 2019After Scott left, The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, which has offices in the building, provided the bishops’ with detailed guidance for an effective day on Capitol Hill. “We want to be here for you, and we want to support the tremendous work that you’re already doing,” said Office of Government Relations Director Rebecca Blachly, whose staff coordinated the congressional meetings and, in most cases, accompanied the bishops from office to office.Washington Bishop Mariann Budde sat in on the introductory sessions, though she would not be participating in the day’s rounds. She and Douglas were joined by six other bishops. Vermont Bishop Tom Ely had not yet arrived, having scheduled his own Capitol Hill visits with Vermont’s congressional delegation.Jack Cobb of the Office of Government Relations coaches the bishops on their upcoming visits with congressional offices during an introductory session Feb. 27 held at the United Methodist Building on Capitol Hill. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceJack Cobb, who tracks domestic policy issues for the Office of Government Relations, highlighted H.R. 8 but also drew the bishops’ attention to H.R. 1112, which seeks to extend the background check waiting period and close what has been called the “Charleston loophole,” exploited by Dylann Roof to purchase the guns used in the killing of seven people in 2015 at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.Cobb noted that legislation is particularly important to Rep. Jim Clyburn, whom the bishops were scheduled to meet with in the afternoon. Clyburn is the House majority whip and a Democrat from South Carolina whose father was a preacher.The 2015 massacre “could have been his church,” Cobb said. “It’s his backyard, and it’s his bill.”What else should the bishops know? The lines into congressional office buildings are often long, so arrive early, Cobb said. At the same time, “members of Congress will often be late.” Many of the meetings would be with lawmakers’ staffs, who will take notes and summarize the meeting in memos to be read later by their bosses.Try to reference any local connections individual bishops have with the lawmakers, Cobb said. Although Long Island Bishop Lawrence Provenzano wasn’t part of these meetings, the bishops should acknowledge Provenzano’s support while meeting with Rep. Peter King, the Long Island Republican, who was a co-sponsor on H.R. 8.For King and other Republicans who broke with their party to support the legislation, “this is a thank you meeting,” Cobb said. “We want them to know they are supported.”To cap their meetings, the bishops were encouraged to provide the lawmakers’ offices with printed materials about Bishops United and The Episcopal Church’s positions on gun violence.Making the rounds on Capitol HillThe Episcopal Church’s advocacy for stricter regulations dates back more than four decades, with General Convention regularly passing resolutions supporting various gun control measures, most recently a resolution last year calling on the federal government to study gun violence as a public health issue.A 1976 resolution took a general stance supporting legislation “aimed at controlling the sale and use of hand guns.” A follow-up resolution in 1991 specifically backed the Brady Bill, which was passed and became law in 1993, establishing waiting periods and background checks for handgun purchases.The Brady Bill and a temporary assault weapons ban in 1994 would be the last significant gun control measures to clear Congress.H.R. 8 was scheduled Feb. 27 for an afternoon vote and likely approval in the House, where Democrats hold the majority, boosting the spirits of the bishops as they prepared to begin their rounds, though Cobb tempered their optimism.“In the Senate is where it will have trouble,” Cobb said, explaining that Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had “zero incentive” to put the Senate’s companion bill, 42, on the agenda for debate.Office of Government Relations Director Rebecca Blachly, left, leads a group of former diocesan bishops: Bishop Joe Doss of New Jersey, Bishop Mark Beckwith of Newark and Bishop Dan Edwards of Nevada. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAfter a brief prayer by Douglas, the bishops split into two groups and headed to their respective appointments. Blachly, walking past the Supreme Court toward the House office buildings, led a group that included three former diocesan bishops, Bishop Mark Beckwith of Newark, Bishop Joe Doss of New Jersey and Bishop Dan Edwards of Nevada. Cobb headed in the opposite direction to the Russell Senate Office Building followed by Douglas, Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe, retired Bishop Suffragan Jim Curry of Connecticut and Bishop Chilton Knudsen, mere days into her new role as assisting bishop in the Diocese of Washington.ENS was not granted access inside any of the meetings at lawmakers’ offices but was able to follow Cobb’s group and interview the bishops throughout the morning as they traveled around Capitol Hill, stopping at three Senate offices.Duncan-Probe admitted early on that she had not expected to take the lead in any of the day’s meetings, given that she is one of the newer members of Bishops United, but she accepted that lead role during her group’s first stop, at the offices of New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democrat who also is running for president.Their meeting was scheduled for 10:45 a.m., but Gillibrand’s representatives were running late because of a meeting at the Capitol. They arrived at 11:13 a.m. and ushered the bishops down the hall and into a meeting room, where Duncan-Probe prepared to kick things off.The door closed. Time from greeting to end of meeting: 21 minutes.Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe prepares to lead her group’s discussion Feb. 27 with staff members of New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s office. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“Excellent job,” Curry said to Duncan-Probe afterward, as the group shuffled along to their next appointment.“I was talking fast because I was nervous,” Duncan-Probe said, but also because she wanted to thoroughly summarize the bishops’ position. “I was trying to figure out the sound bite I wanted her to take back to Kirsten. … We’re a voting bloc.”Duncan-Probe elaborated later that her diocese is “struggling with the diversity of this issue.” Episcopalians in Central New York include hunters, military veterans and others who are comfortable around guns, as well as liberal-minded Episcopalians who may never have even held a gun, much less shot one.“Across the diocese there’s a commitment to having a safe society and a just society,” Duncan-Probe said, even if individuals don’t always agree on the particular approaches.Jack Cobb and the bishops watch the Michael Cohen testimony on TV as they wait for their next meeting Feb. 27 in the office of Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceCobb led the group to a basement corridor so they could pass underground into the Hart Senate Office Building.“Our other meeting has” – he looked at his watch – “started. So we need to keep moving.”The bishops had hoped to meet in person with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, a Democrat from Rhode Island and a fellow Episcopalian, but he was tied up in a committee meeting. As Cobb’s group waited in Whitehouse’s office, they glanced at a TV that was tuned to CNN and the Cohen hearing.At 11:42 a.m., Whitehouse’s legal counsel Ches Garrison arrived and invited the bishops into a meeting room. Curry took the lead this time. Afterward, they all posed for a group photo.Meeting duration: 31 minutes.“We’re dealing with allies,” Curry told ENS on the way out. Trying to persuade a senator or representative to change a “no” vote to a “yes” is important, but Curry said it also is necessary to support those already fighting for reform. “We weren’t saying anything new, and yet we’re received with a sense of gratitude, that we are doing this work.”The Bishops United group poses for a photo with Ches Garrison, legal counsel for Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, after their meeting Feb. 27. From left are Jack Cobb of the Office of Government Relations, retired Connecticut Bishop Suffragan Jim Curry, Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, Garrison, Washington Assisting Bishop Chilton Knudsen and Douglas’ wife, Kristin Harris. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceBishops embrace anti-violence mission, impossible to ignoreTheir last stop before lunch was the office of Sen. Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut.“Oh, great. Time for me to go to work,” Douglas said. He took the lead when a woman with Murphy’s staff greeted them and led them to a meeting room.As they met, the Cohen testimony continued on the TV near the office’s entrance, this one tuned to MSNBC. Nearby, a map of Connecticut features tiny pins placed across the state, put there by the many people who have come to visit the senator’s office. Four individuals entered the office and placed an additional pin on Sandy Hook. They were from Newtown Action Alliance and had come for their own meeting.The Bishops United group chats Feb. 27 with the Rev. Michele Morgan, rector of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill, who was visiting Sen. Chris Murphy’s office as part of a group from Newtown Action Alliance. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceWhen the bishops wrapped up – 24 minutes – they greeted the Newtown group like old friends. One of them was the Rev. Michele Morgan, of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill, who is active on gun violence issues in Washington. Another was Eric Milgram, whose daughter was a first-grader at Sandy Hook at the time of the massacre and survived.“Are you pounding the pavement?” Newtown Action Alliance Chairwoman Po Murray asked.“Oh, yeah,” Douglas replied.At lunch back at the United Methodist Building, Douglas told ENS he always begins conversations on these issues by saying he never intended it to be part of his agenda when he became bishop, but it became unavoidable after Dec. 12, 2012. St. John’s Episcopal Church next to Sandy Hook Elementary School became a site for community grieving after the massacre, and on a more personal level, Douglas felt the impact of the rampage directly during a service for Ben Wheeler, one of the young victims whose family attended Trinity Episcopal Church in Newtown.“I made a commitment to his parents, that this would be part of my vocation and my ministry as long as I’m bishop,” Douglas said.He thinks Murphy feels the same, but in the role of a lawmaker instead of a religious leader. Murphy was the congressman representing Newtown at the time of the shooting, and now as senator, he is the lead sponsor of the Senate bill seeking to expand background checks.After lunch, most of the bishops left for the Capitol to meet with Clyburn, the majority whip. Ely, after sharing a meal with his fellow bishops, parted ways to see his home-state senator, Patrick Leahy, a Democrat. But when Ely arrived in Leahy’s office, the office TV was tuned not to the Cohen hearing but to Leahy’s floor speech in the Senate on climate change. Was Leahy unavailable to meet in person?Moments later, Leahy senior adviser Kevin McDonald arrived and reassured Ely that the senator was waiting to meet the bishop over in the Capitol. “This is [Leahy’s] biggest meeting of the day,” McDonald said.Meanwhile, as the House debated the background check bill, Douglas and Knudsen made their way to the lawn on the east side of the Capitol, where celebratory gatherings were planned for the bill’s expected passage. The Newtown Action Alliance representatives met them there.Bishops United would spend much of Feb. 28 meeting with Newtown Action Alliance and other partners in the fight against gun violence as the bishops plot the network’s future path. Their week culminates March 1 with a noon prayer service that will be streamed live on Facebook.On Feb. 27, news broke around 4 p.m. that H.R. 8 cleared the House by a vote of 240-190, and lawmakers began pouring out of the Capitol for photo-ops, some in front of the Capitol’s steps and others on the lawn. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined a crowd of bill supporters and posed for photos with them standing next to Rep. Lucy McBath, a freshman Democrat from Georgia whose son was shot and killed in 2012. (The House would pass Clyburn’s “Charleston loophole” bill the next day.)Douglas, Knudsen and the group from Newtown Action Alliance gravitated to a nearby spot on the Capitol steps where members of the Connecticut congressional delegation, including Murphy, had gathered to herald the House [email protected] speaks with his state’s senators @SenBlumenthal and @ChrisMurphyCT in the wake of the House passing #HR8 on universal background checks. #BishopsOnTheHill #EpiscopalAdvocacy pic.twitter.com/ViCHlItxOx— The Cross Lobby (@TheCrossLobby) February 27, 2019Murphy vowed to work toward passage in the Senate as well, while acknowledging that progress on gun reform has long been an uphill battle.“This is an advertisement for why elections matter,” the senator said. “This is an advertisement for why persistent political action matters. Big social change doesn’t happen overnight. You hit obstacles. You fail before you succeed.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Public Policy Network, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

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Belles explore College’s past

first_imgSaint Mary’s students will have the opportunity to trace the footsteps of earlier Belles during Heritage Week, to be held this year Feb. 18 to 22. Heritage Week celebrates Saint Mary’s history, giving students insight into the traditions of the College. Heritage Week will feature tours of Saint Mary’s landmarks and speakers from around campus. Senior student government vice president Meghan Casey said she hopes students take the time to enjoy the events offered during the week. “I am hoping for good attendance at events because they are really awesome this year,” she said. “It’s nice that we have different time slots for different events so more students can join us. They are all awesome opportunities for our students at Saint Mary’s. They really show the true nature and past of the College.” The week kicks off Monday with Heritage Room tours with Sr. Veronique Wiedower, Casey said. Tuesday will feature Tea Tours at the Riedinger House. The Riedinger House once played host to some of the College’s classes but now is only used for special events and socials. Sophomore Grace McSorley said she is “most excited” for tea at the Riedinger House. “I have always wondered what the inside of that little house looks like because it’s so cute from the outside,” she said. Saint Mary’s students will tour the archive rooms in Madeleva on Wednesday, Casey said. On Thursday the Belles will gather for dinner during dining hall hours, where chair of the board of trustees Mary L. Burke and Wiedower are speaking, Casey said. “I am really looking forward to the dinner to hear from Sr. Veronique,” Casey said. “I am excited to hear her speak and I just love the whole week. It really shows the importance of knowing the history of the College and the support that students, faculty and staff give to college. It’s been really fun to plan and get ready for.” On Friday the Belles will conclude the week by congregating for Mass in the Holy Spirit Chapel of LeMans Hall, Casey said. Student government vice president of external affairs Katherine Sullivan said the week offers students ways to learn about achievements of former Saint Mary’s students. “I think that Heritage Week is so important because it embodies the past, present and future stories of Saint Mary’s College,” she said. “By signing up for our events and attending things like the History of Social Events featuring alumna and author Kymberly Dunlap Andren [of the class of 2004], students will learn about past Belles and their journeys.” Sullivan said the week’s events not only serve as a bonding experience but a learning one as well. “Heritage Week strengthens our community and teaches students about the College’s great journey,” she said. “I truly hope that we see many students attend these events and learn about how this wonderful place came to be and continues to grow.” Saint Mary’s editor Jillian Barwick contributed to this report. Contact Kelly Kony at [email protected]last_img read more

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Credit unions ask CFPB to limit business loan rules

first_img continue reading » As the CFPB contemplates regulations governing small business lending, credit unions are asking the agency to ensure that any rules do not conflict with NCUA requirements and do not require data collection that could be misleading.The CFPB held a field hearing on small business lending in Los Angeles Wednesday and agency officials said that they are soliciting advice on how to collect data on small business lending—a requirement under the Dodd-Frank Act.“Given the importance of small businesses to our economy and their critical need to access financing if they are to prosper and grow, it is vitally important to fill in the blanks on how small businesses are able to engage with the credit markets,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said in remarks prepared for the hearing.NAFCU is asking the agency to exempt credit unions from any new rules that requires disclosure of business loan information. 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Barbados rolls out red carpet for royal visit

first_img Sharing is caring! 42 Views   no discussions Share NewsRegional Barbados rolls out red carpet for royal visit by: – February 24, 2012 Sharecenter_img Share Tweet Earl and Countess of Wessex, Prince Edward and Princess Sophie. Photo credit: media.universalorlando.comBRIDGETOWN, Barbados — With much pomp and ceremony on Thursday, the Barbados government rolled out the ‘red carpet’ for the Earl and Countess of Wessex, Prince Edward and Princess Sophie during a joint sitting of Parliament in the Senate Chambers.During an address before the Earl and Countess and their entourage, parliamentarians and senators, Speaker of the House, Michael Carrington, said Barbados would, forever, be indebted to Her Majesty for providing “that powerful and necessary symbol of continuity and assurance by remaining as the Head of State”.He added: “Her [Queen Elizabeth’s II] benevolent presence has given us the space and time to grow, not in revolutionary steps, but through sure and quiet progress. In the past 45 years, our democracy has flourished, our people have advanced and our institutions have grown stronger.”Reflecting on the significance of the signing of the 1652 Charter of Barbados, Carrington observed that securing the rights to self-rule, free trade, the right to property and the freedom from taxation without their consent through a general assembly, were at the core of the modern representative parliamentary democracy.The Speaker pointed out that although some critics were skeptical about the island’s capabilities to chart its own destiny in 1966, the architects of its Constitution were “sensitive to the anxieties of the people and conscious of the need to build on the foundations of the past. Thus, they sought to provide an environment of certainty and continuity, which would allow the new nation to develop in peace and grow in self-confidence”. Carrington acknowledged that while one cannot say what future constitutional requirements the country may require from government, he said the island would be forever indebted to Queen Elizabeth II.“We are all convinced of one thing; that the deep and enduring commitment of her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Barbados, to her loyal subjects, the people of Barbados…will always retain an enduring place in our hearts…,” he underlined.Meanwhile, deputy president of the Senate, Kerry-ann Ifill, described Queen Elizabeth’s II 60 years of unbroken reign as a remarkable achievement and said that Barbadians of all ages held her in high esteem.“She has devoted her entire life to the solemn duties which destiny has required of her and for steadfast dedication to the service of her people within Great Britain and throughout the Commonwealth,” Ifill emphasised.Acknowledging that the celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of the Queen’s reign came against a backdrop of uncertain economic circumstances, the deputy president urged Barbadians to be guided by a spirit of resilience and faith as espoused in the Queen’s Christmas Message last year.In response, Prince Edward thanked the government for the opportunity to represent the Queen at the historic joint sitting of Parliament and conveyed Her Majesty’s delight in the country’s development.“Barbados and Barbadians hold a special place in Her Majesty’s heart. She takes a keen interest in all that you do and is proud of your achievement, in particular, the progress Barbados has made in its 45 years as a sovereign state. Her affection towards you remains strong and constant as the day, 60 years ago, when she acceded to the Throne and pledged to dedicate her life to service of the people of her realms and territories,” he added. At the end of the historic sitting, the Earl, attired in a dark coloured suit and the Countess, in a beige and gold dupioni silk sleeveless dress by designer Maxmara, toured the Parliament Museum and National Heroes Gallery, along with government officials.The royal couple was able to get a picture of moments in Barbados’ history and learn about some of this nation’s finest citizens during the tour.Facilities coordinator David Best explained the significance of each exhibit. They showed keen interest in the displays, especially the life and history of Errol Walton Barrow, Sarah-ann Gill and Clement Payne, and the metallic sculpture by Dr Lance Bannister, among others.The Earl and Countess of Wessex were especially captivated by a video documentary of the life and times of Barbados’ only living national hero, Sir Garfield Sobers, and his knighthood by Her Majesty, The Queen, in 1977 at the Garrison Historic Area.At the end of the tour, they waved to a few supporters who lined the streets to get a glimpse of the royal party.Friday’s leg of the state visit will see the royal couple visiting a number of facilities. During the morning, the Countess will visit the Albert Cecil Graham Development Centre, while the Earl will present eight young Barbadians with Duke of Edinburgh Gold Awards at Government House. Immediately following, they will attend a ceremony in commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee at the historic Kensington Oval, where the Earl will unveil a plaque. National Hero, Sir Garfield Sobers, will also be in attendance. The royal couple will also meet and be entertained by students from select schools.The prime minister will host their royal highnesses at a lunch at Ilaro Court. Later that afternoon, the Earl and Countess will visit the Nidhe Israel Synagogue and Museum and the Mikvah (spiritual bath) in Bridgetown. Following this, the royal party will tour the Prince Cave Hall, home of the renowned Royal Barbados Police Force Band. The curtain will come down at 6:30 pm, when the royal party will host a reception before departing Barbados for St Vincent and the Grenadines.By Caribbean News Now contributorlast_img read more

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10 months agoPochettino insists Walker-Peters important for Tottenham title tilt

first_imgPochettino insists Walker-Peters important for Tottenham title tiltby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveMauricio Pochettino says Kyle Walker-Peters emergence will aid Tottenham Hotspurs’ title tilt.The 21-year-old made a horrendous mistake against Barcelona a few weeks ago, in what was his first start of the season.However, during the hectic festive period, Pochettino has stuck with the Englishman, who rewarded his faith with a fine performance against Bournemouth on Boxing Day.”It’s no surprise to me. I told you after the match in Barcelona that we really believe in him and he has amazing quality and only needs time to mature and show his quality.”I’m so pleased, so happy, because I think his quality is going to help the team this season and for the future he’s going to be a very important player for Tottenham.”Did I have to speak to him after the mistake? Not really, because this type of thing happens in football. The first person who knows that very well is the players, to come in after and try to make sure that that situation meant a lot to you there is no point.” The 5-0 win over the Cherries elevated Tottenham into second place, leapfrogging champions Manchester City by one point. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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GM raises 2018 forecast predicts stronger 2019 earnings

first_imgDETROIT — General Motors strengthened its pretax profit estimate for 2018 and predicted even stronger performance for 2019 as it executives made a presentation to investors on Friday.CEO Mary Barra also says the company doesn’t foresee any further job cuts through 2020. Last year GM announced plans to close five North American factories and lay off 14,000 salaried and blue-collar workers.The company predicts 2018 pretax profits will be higher than the $5.80 to $6.20 range it forecast in the third quarter. For 2019, it expects that to increase to $6.50 to $7.The rosy profit forecast comes despite declining sales for the company in the U.S. and slowing sales in China. GM also plans to exit several car lines in the U.S. in the coming year.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Council to review snow clearing policy on Monday

first_imgCouncil will review the policy on Monday and determine the next steps to update the snow removal policy.  The full report being presented to Council is below. Snow removal is a source of financial stress for the City with snowfall amounts being unpredictable, finding the most financially efficient way to move the snow is an asset.With the 2017 and 2018 budgets exceeding the allocated snow clearing funds due to heavy snowfall. Having the right equipment and system in place is a must to ensure priorities for snow and ice control for streets, parking lots, and sidewalk/trails.The draft policy that will be presented to Council on Monday identifies priorities for snow and ice control for streets, parking lots, and sidewalk/trails. It also identifies levels of response which are operationalized in the administrative procedure.The draft also allows for the use of contracted services to help with clearing the streets and parking lots. Typically the contractors would work in a residential area, allowing City crews to move back to higher priority areas if required. It also allows for the ability to open a street, to make it safer to drive one – although it is not cleared from curb to curb. Crews would later go back and clear the street from curb to curb. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Fort St. John City Council will hear from City staff Monday about a new plan for clearing snow in the City.Staff say the City can’t meet the existing policy directive with current resources. During the last review of the policy in 2010, staff changed to the current procedure that takes much longer to remove snow but doesn’t block residential drives.  Before 2010, plow trucks were used to remove snow with clearing completed within one to two days, yet the plows filled peoples driveways.Council asked staff before Christmas to review the current procedure and policy to align the two and to improve efficiencies.last_img read more

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East Bypass Road to be called Northern Lights Drive

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – With the East Bypass Road no longer functioning as a bypass road to re-direct traffic around the City and due to the steady residential growth, this requires the renaming of the road to the Northern Lights Drive.The name Northern Lights Drive becomes effective June 26, 2019, which City Council recognizes will require an address change. The City shares while this is necessary, this may cause some inconvenience to affected Property Owners.Recently, the City sent letters by registered mail regarding the renaming of the road to help alleviate the inconvenience, remuneration is available to affected Property Owners by following the steps identified in the letter.If you have questions, contact the Planning and Engineering Department at; 250-787-8150 or email; [email protected]last_img read more

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SP-BSP announce alliance for 48 Maharashtra Lok Sabha seats

first_imgMumbai: The Samajwadi Party and Bahujan Samaj Party Tuesday announced they would contest all 48 Lok Sabha seats in Maharashtra in alliance. Announcing the alliance, SP MLA Abu Asim Azmi said the two parties together represent about “85-90 per cent” of the society and provided a third front for people let down by the BJP and Congress. “Secularism is about to end in the country. Those who call themselves chowkidars can go to any length, and peddle lies, to cling on to power,” he alleged. He claimed only the SP-BSP alliance was strong enough to stop the BJP from winning over 5-7 seats in Maharashtra. Attacking the Congress, Azmi said the main opposition party had made Muslims, Dalits and the backward classes “helpless”, as there was no third alternative available for people. “However, after our decision to contest all 48 seats, a third front will be available. We represent 85-90 per cent of society,” he claimed. Azmi said discussions on the seat-sharing formula was yet to begin between the two parties and a committee had been formed to take it forward. The formula would be announced in two to three days, he asserted. He added that no other party had approached them as yet to be part of the alliance. BSP MP Ashok Siddharth alleged the Congress’ policies for Muslims, Dalits and backward classes remained on paper and could not penetrate to the ground level, adding that the SP-BSP will ensure these policies reach the common man. Siddharth said BSP chief Mayawati will address a public rally in Nagpur on April 5 and the party would also request SP chief Akhilesh Yadav to be part of it.last_img read more

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