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‘Fight for $15’ tells bosses to raise wages

first_imgAtlantaBoth big and militant, the day started with a rally on the Atlanta University campus with a wide variety of low-wage workers representing fast food, home health care, domestic, retail, airport workers and adjunct professors. Various unions, including the Teamsters and the Communication Workers, came with signs and banners, as did the NAACP, SCLC, DSA and others. The International Action Center had two banners.The crowd of about 600 took the streets, marching to a nearby McDonald’s where they rushed in, filling the place with chants. Militant protesters stood on tables, waving their signs. Hundreds surrounded the building, shutting it down for about half an hour before marching two blocks to Walmart. The crowd blocked the entrance, which management had already locked when they saw the demonstration coming. Security let customers out but no one in. The protesters chanted there for about 30 minutes. The police were there throughout, but didn’t take any action to stop the protest from taking the streets, swarming inside the McDonald’s or blocking the Walmart doors.—  Dianne MathiowetzMemphisThe wage protests started early around 6, with a group of about 20 people in front of one of the busier McDonald’s. The group remained small until it moved to the University of Memphis campus, where students and some professors quickly swelled the ranks to at least 100. A table was set up by the people who organized the day’s protests: the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center and the Show Me 15 members, who handed out T-shirts, stickers, signs and buttons. The crowd heard from local workers and university personnel brave enough to speak out. Between speakers there were chants of “Show me $15 and a union.”After an hour on campus, a larger group marched through the University Student Center, with chants of “Who shuts shit down? We shut shit down!” and calls echoing off the walls for fast food workers to come join us. The group then marched to another McDonald’s, where it spread out along the block, and we heard from more local workers. Many cars honked approval.Shortly before we were to depart for Ferguson, Mo., a charter bus from Little Rock arrived, swelling our numbers to around 250 to 300 people. The atmosphere was incredible; there was a tangible feeling of pride and optimism that we had beaten the apathy that often plagues many social and political movements in Memphis, if even only for a day. The police had been hands-off, allowing us to march where we wanted so long as we stayed on public property. A couple even spoke to a small group privately and voiced their support for our protest.The only trouble that we experienced was when we went to board the buses to Ferguson. The only white driver refused to transport part of the group when he realized we were protesters and made a claim that some had threatened him. A few in the crowd labeled that racism, but group leaders were quick to stop that by finding alternative transport. About 200 protesters —young and old, students, workers and professionals — crammed into two charter buses and several small vans in preparation for the five-hour drive.— Brent FordChicagoThousands of low-wage workers flooded the streets here demanding $15 and a union. Workers walked out of their workplaces all over the city protesting during the morning commute at a McDonald’s restaurant and then at a massive afternoon rally at the University of Illinois Chicago before protesters marched and gathered outside another McDonald’s restaurant in the Loop.“April 15 showed the world our growing strength as low-wage workers organizing to better our lives,” said Tommy Cavanaugh, a low-wage worker from Rockford, Ill., who traveled to the Chicago protests with two dozen of his fellow workers and supporters. “With each strike we gain more workers who understand that standing together is the only way we can live with dignity. The bosses have tried to stop us through ignoring us, intimidation and most recently attempting to buy us off with phony raises for a tiny section of workers. The unprecedented number of strikers and support from all sectors of the working class and oppressed showed without a doubt that the bosses’ tactics have failed to slow the rising tide of low-wage workers organizing and fighting back.” Cavanaugh is also an organizer with Rockford Fight Imperialism, Stand Together (FIST), which is helping to assist and organize low-wage workers. (facebook.com/RKFDFIST)MilwaukeeRaise Up MKE and Wisconsin Jobs Now, with major support from numerous labor-community organizations, held a series of actions. The day began with a 6 a.m. protest at a McDonald’s and then a rally took place at Red Arrow Park, the site where Dontre Hamilton, a 31-year-old African American man, was killed by Milwaukee police officer Christoper Manney  on April 30, 2014. Dontre’s brother, Nate Hamilton, spoke in solidarity with the Fight For $15 workers and supporters. A protest by Wisconsin Jobs Now was held at Grand Avenue Mall in downtown Milwaukee, and SEIU custodians and other members joined a march down Wisconsin Avenue, the major street in downtown Milwaukee. The day concluded with a rally of hundreds of low-wage workers and their supporters demanding $15 and a union at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. (facebook.com/RaiseUpMKE)Madison, Wis.Beginning with a march down East Washington Avenue, where workers at multiple fast food restaurants joined the growing march, protesters gathered at Library Mall at the University of Wisconsin Madison to demand $15 and a union. These actions were organized by Wisconsin Jobs Now, AFSCME, Industrial Workers of the World and the Workers’ Rights Center. At UW-Madison, the Fight For 15 members and supporters, which included teaching assistants and adjuncts, did outreach at Memorial Union. Like many campuses nationwide, UW Madison has a swamp of low-wage restaurants, campus offices and classrooms where students, staff, faculty and other community workers toil for below-poverty wages.Luke Gangler works with the UW Madison Student Labor Action Coalition, which protests against UW’s licensing agreement with Jansport, a Wisconsin company based in Appleton. Gangler urged worker unity with all those fighting for a living wage and protesting union busting and related austerity measures. The UW administration refuses to cut ties to Jansport’s parent company over working conditions in Bangladesh and says jobs are provided in the Appleton factory. “But the Appleton workers don’t make a living wage; their fight is the same fight as the Bangladeshi workers thousands of miles away,” said Gangler. (madison.com)Wausau, Wis.Numerous workers here briefly walked off their jobs to demand $15 and a union.— Workers World Milwaukee bureauBay Area, CaliforniaAll the McDonald’s in Oakland and a number of others across the Bay Area were shut down simultaneously at 8 a.m. as part of the national day for $15 and a union. The Oakland workers and community activists then converged on the McDonald’s on Telegraph Avenue and 45th Street, packing it and massing a huge overflow crowd in the parking lot outside. Later about 1,000 low-wage workers and community members from all over the Bay Area rallied at the University of California Berkeley campus, then marched to downtown Berkeley, shutting down yet another McDonald’s.— Terri KaySeattleSeattle’s new minimum wage law finally went into effect on April 1, and40,000 workers at big companies got raises to $11 an hour The new law will raise the wages of 100,000 low-wage workers. Companies employing 500 or more workers will have to pay the $15 an hour minimum by Jan. 1, 2017.While governmental groups like the city and the county boosted pay to $11, the rich University of Washington refused raises to student workers. After two militant protests by students and workers, UW caved and agreed to pay 2,600 student workers the $11an hourOn April 15, under the slogan “15 is just the beginning; inequality ends with us,” workers held marches and other actions in at least 12 Washington cities. With coordination from the Service Employees, Food & Commercial Workers, the Teamsters, and 15Now, 800 to 1,000 marched in Seattle. The demonstration of fast food and retail workers, child care and home care workers, drivers and adjunct professors, airport workers and more marched 2 miles through downtown.The march went to Uber headquarters, the alternative taxi business and a high-priced, high-profit, poverty-wage company. Uber’s immigrant workers are organizing a drivers’ association supported by the rest of the labor movement. The march also encircled Macy’s downtown store, where one-third of the workers got raises on April 1. But UFCW told the crowd that Macy’s workers’ hours have been cut and they’ve suffered other attacks.The march then went to Seattle University, where adjunct professors making poverty wages have been held back from gaining union recognition. The university, claiming a religious exemption, won’t allow a vote count for union recognition, which the teachers believe they will win.After hundreds of workers crowded into the SU business school for an occupation, the march then moved to a large nearby intersection. Twenty-one workers, representing many low-wage occupations, sat down and refused to leave until they were arrested by the cops. They symbolized the determination to resist until $15 and a better world is won for all workers.— Jim McMahan BaltimorePhoto: Bill HughesLow-wage workers in the tens of thousands, in 263 cities and towns, went on strike from coast to coast on April 15 for $15 an hour and union representation without retaliation. It signaled a growing escalation in the workers’ struggle in the U.S.Joined by protests in 40 countries on five continents — from San Paulo, Brazil, to Seoul; Amsterdam to Auckland, New Zealand; Toronto to Tokyo — April 15 represents an emerging global movement against low wages.Nothing like this upsurge of working-class protest has been seen in the U.S. since the national May Day demonstration in 2006, led by thousands of migrants from many nations.DetroitWW photo: Abayomi AzikiweOrganizers deliberately called the nationwide protest on April 15, Tax Day, to emphasize that taxpayers subsidize mega-billion-dollar imperialist giants like McDonald’s and Walmart that pay workers poverty wages. A study, released April 13 by the Labor Center at the University of California Berkeley, reports $153 billion for such public assistance as food stamps, Medicaid and housing subsidies is needed to sustain underpaid working families.A report by the National Employment Law Project, also released April 13, found nearly half the U.S. workforce (42 percent) makes less than $15 an hour. Women and people of color are disproportionately represented in the underpaid workforce, with over 50 percent of African-American workers and nearly 60 percent of Latino workers making less than $15.Three new layers broaden struggleNew YorkWW photo: Anne PrudenWorkers in the fast food industry started this struggle two and a half years ago. This time other sectors were also on board with walkouts, marches, rallies and die-ins, from Atlanta to Los Angeles. In addition to members of community and faith-based groups and unionized workers proudly showing solidarity, three new groups came out for the first time: workers in other low-wage jobs, activists in the Black Lives Matter movement and students.Legions of underpaid, unorganized home care and child care workers, car washers, adjunct and graduate student teachers, retail and dollar store clerks, unorganized construction laborers, airport service and laundry workers, and all kinds of part-time, temporary and contract workers joined the Fight for $15.For the first time, manufacturing workers joined the strike. Members of the United Electrical Workers Local 150 in Whitakers, N.C., who work at the Cummins Inc. Rocky Mount Engine Plant, held a press conference to announce their support for Fight for $15: “Thousands of manufacturing workers, including over 100 RMEP workers, are paid even less than the $10.10/hr minimum wage President Obama has advocated. We are also fighting against companies’ violating our union rights.” (UE press release)Voting spontaneously to walk off the job in Chicago were a group of about 50 unorganized drivers and security guards at Brink’s, the global security company. They’re fed up because the company recently reduced its contribution to their 401(k)s; now pays for only five hours of overtime, though they often put in 60- to 80-hour weeks; and new messengers and drivers make less than $15, while United Postal Service and FedEx workers make over $20 an hour. (In These Times, April 15)African-American youth linked the Black Lives Matter movement to the low-wage struggle. A banner headline on the Facebook page of Fast Food Forward proclaims: “Economic justice is racial justice.” Dramatic links were made when early-morning demonstrators in Brooklyn, N.Y., picketed a McDonald’s wearing T-shirts reading, “I can’t breathe, Fight for $15.” And a die-in was staged at noon in front of a McDonald’s on the Upper West Side of Manhattan for four minutes and 15 seconds — to symbolize the struggle.“We joined the Fight for $15 because, for us, racial justice is economic justice,” said Charlene A. Carruthers, national director of Black Youth 100. “We believe that Black workers have paid undeserved debts to greedy corporations for far too long.” Her nonprofit organization started the Black Work Matters campaign, also known as Fight for $15. (Common Dreams, April 15)After demonstrating in Memphis, more than 200 workers and students, joined by forces from Little Rock, Tenn., boarded chartered buses and several small vans for the five-hour drive to join the Fight for $15 action in Ferguson, Mo.College and university students came out in droves, driven by the burden of student loans and foreseeing a debt-ridden future. “It’s important for students to be involved,” said Robert Ascherman, a student activist from New York University, “because even if we aren’t working for McDonald’s or Walmart, we are still on McDonald’s or Walmart type of wages.” Even now, some students have to choose between buying food or buying textbooks.Mary Kay Henry, Service Employees international president, said that students on 170 campuses were expected to join the struggle. On a recent tour of six colleges, she “saw students everywhere on fire to fight for their future and link arms with these workers … to change this low-wage economy.”Even the Wall Street Journal, the ruling-class mouthpiece, ran an article April 15 stating that though $15 an hour for fast food workers “seems a real stretch” … [it] “may not be such a reach,” citing cities like Seattle and San Francisco where workers are now making $15 an hour and noting struggles in many cities and states to boost their minimum wage.The working-class genie that popped out of the capitalist bottle on April 15 — asserting the collective might of a determined working class — cannot be shoved back into that bottle.Fight for $15 RoundupMembers and friends of Workers World who participated in or observed the Fight for $15 and a union struggle on April 15 sent in reports from their cities. Excerpted or lightly edited versions appear here.Syracuse, N.Y.Over 100 people spilled into the street at a Fight for $15 sidewalk rally called by the Workers Center of Central New York and Service Employees 1199 Local 200United. “Strike poverty!” was the cry, as several low-wage women workers spoke of their struggles. One said of her part-time fast food job: “I work as hard as any factory worker.”Community and labor support was dramatic. Organized labor turned out, from many building trades locals — including roofers, insulators, plumbers—to members from transit, civil service, health care, teacher and writer unions. Present were local members of the United Auto Workers who had militantly refused New Process Gear’s offer to “save their jobs” — they gave thumbs down to a paycut to $16 an hour.Organizations in support included the Upstate Coalition to Ground the Drones and End the Wars, Syracuse Peace Council, Spanish Action League, Green Party and local churches.— Minnie Bruce PrattPhiladelphiaOver 500 marchers demanding a $15 minimum wage and a union, some of them fast food store strikers, took over JFK Boulevard near the 30th Street Station as part of the largest U.S. low-wage worker protest in modern history.Adjuncts and students at Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania, airport, laundry, health care, nursing home and restaurant workers marched with a large contingent of purple-shirted Service Employee members and other union and social activists. The protesters stopped for a short rally in front of the Comcast Headquarters, a $130 billion company which pays very little in Philadelphia taxes, yet actively opposes sick leave for low-wage restaurant workers.Rallies also took place on North Philly’s Temple campus, on West Philly’s UPenn campus and in South Philadelphia before eventually joining this city’s largest low-wage protest to date.— Joseph PietteBaltimoreOver 100 people participated in a spirited rally and march to demand $15 an hour and a union. Protesters called for a livable wage and no police terror, racism and water shutoffs — referring to the city’s plan to shut off water to 25,000 Baltimore city and county residents. Community and Black Lives Matter activists came together with trade union members and low-wage workers.Courtney Jenkins, American Postal Workers Union member and the new head of the Young Trade Unionists, along with Sharon Black, of the People’s Power Assembly, chaired the event. Low- wage workers testified to the hardships they encountered on the job. Fred Mason, president of the Maryland and D.C. AFL-CIO, spoke along with APWU Local 181 President George Askew. University of Maryland, Baltimore County student Benji Shulman helped to lead songs, along with Dick Ochs and Andre Powell, who is an American Federation of State, County, Municipal Employees delegate to the Baltimore Metropolitan Council.The group marched to a nearby McDonald’s at Light and Baltimore streets. A heavy police presence guarded the McDonald’s entrance. After a second rally there, the group took to the streets and marched to the Main Post Office in solidarity with postal workers who had turned out in large numbers. The postal workers are fighting the privatization of postal services and the plan to turn union work over to low-wage, non-union Staples.The Baltimore action in support of low-wage workers was initiated by the People’s Power Assembly, its sister group “We Deserve Better” Workers Assembly and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Baltimore Chapter. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council of the AFL-CIO endorsed the action and sent information  to all their affiliates.Organizers noted that Baltimore is deeply impoverished, with one out of every four people living in poverty, with low wages a major reason. The number of unionized workers in Baltimore is low because the majority of work is in traditional low-wage jobs like fast food and retail. Many of the major industries like steel and auto have closed their plants.— Workers World Baltimore bureauRaleigh, N.C.Thousands gathered together from all across the state, many with the assistance of a fleet of buses carrying people from as far afield as Charlotte, on the campus of Shaw University, the birthplace of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 55 years ago, to demand that all workers earn a living wage of $15  an hour for their labor. The crowd, excited in spite of the rain, beheld with rapt attention a diverse array of speakers, drawn from the ranks of students, adjunct faculty and fast food, home care, child care, public service and farm workers, all of whom articulated their need to be treated with dignity for their socially necessary labor. They also univocally condemned the conditions of poverty which their various employers have deemed fit to foist upon them.A keynote address was delivered afterwards by North Carolina NAACP President Rev. Dr. William Barber, in which he castigated material deprivation as itself being a form of violence, highlighted links between the struggles for economic and racial justice, and cited Dr. King’s proclamation on March 18, 1968, that unless the United States addresses the issue of poverty it will, like Dives for refusing to aid Lazarus, “Go to Hell.”The crowd then began a march, first crossing over a pair of footbridges, which shook under the weight of the multitude, spanning the three lanes of S. Blount Street, then striding through another block of Shaw’s campus before ultimately spilling out onto S. Wilmington Street. They then headed north toward, E. South Street, as they filled the air with chants such as “We can’t survive on $7.25.” As they walked around the block and passed under the bridges they had earlier crossed, a large segment of the crowd began to chant “Black Lives Matter,” recognizing in that slogan, not solely opposition to the heinous murders of Black people at the hands of the police, but also  affirmation that Black housing, Black health care, Black employment and Black wages matter.The procession continued around the block back to Wilmington Street, where it stopped near a sign commemorating the founding of SNCC in 1960. Underneath the sign more workers offered testimonials of their maltreatment by the rapacious capitalist class.— Patrick SnipesWhitakers, N.C.At a press conference here, United Electrical Workers Local 150 members at Cummins Inc. Rocky Mount Engine Plant announced that they are joining the international fight for a $15 minimum wage and union rights. The movement started with fast food workers; RMEP workers are the first known manufacturing workers in the country to join this movement. Today’s press conference was the only known activity in Eastern North Carolina that was part of this international day of action.Jimmie Thorne, chair of the DTZ workers branch of the UE150 Union, said, “We are here to support fast food and other service workers. Thousands of manufacturing workers, including over 100 workers RMEP workers, are paid even less than the $10.10/hr minimum wage President Obama has advocated. We are also fighting against companies’ violating our union rights.”Marilyn Williams, quality inspector and union member at RMEP contractor Tri-County Industries, makes only $7.50 per hour. “We can’t live on that. While contract workers are not direct employees of Cummins’ RMEP, RMEP must spend some of the billions in profit so that we can make a $15-an-hour minimum wage.”Rev. Vivian Lucas, of the National United Church of Christ, committed the ministry to “support a living wage for workers at the RMEP plant and all Eastern N.C. manufacturing workers [many of whom are African American].” Black Lives Matter in the workplace and community; workers, their families and communities are in a literal life-and-death situation.A unique aspect of this fight is that the union is holding RMEP accountable for the wages of all workers, including the contractors. RMEP contractors do housekeeping, maintenance, delivery, inspecting, packing, security and other jobs. DTZ, Tri County Industries, Manpower, Insource, Universal Protection Services and FDY are some of these contractors. Other workers joining the overall national fight movement are child care, home health care and adjunct/temporary university faculty.The Carolina Auto, Aerospace and Machine Workers Union is also calling for a $2 hour technician pay scale increase for Cummins workers at RMEP: Raise entry pay from $13.19 to $15.19, raise top pay from $20.91 to $22.91 and raise all levels of the 14-step pay scale by $2 an hour.Recently 500 workers from North Carolina and ten other southern states gathered at Dr. King’s Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta to build the movement for economic and racial justice and pledge to organize the South. They were joined by members of the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers’ strike who marched with Dr. King before he was assassinated.— UE150 press release FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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JPL’s Prolific Mars Orbiter Completes 50,000 Orbits

first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Top of the News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * The most data-productive spacecraft yet at Mars swept past its 50,000th orbit this week, continuing to compile the most sharp-eyed global coverage ever accomplished by a camera at the Red Planet.In addition, the spacecraft — NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) — recently aided preparations for NASA’s next mission to Mars, the InSight lander. Insight will launch next year on a mission to study the planet’s deep interior. Meanwhile, the orbiter continues diverse science observations of Mars and communications-relay service for two active Mars rovers, Curiosity and Opportunity.MRO’s Context Camera (CTX) exploits a sweet spot in the balance between resolution and image file size. With a resolution of about 20 feet (6 meters) per pixel in images of the Martian surface, it has provided a library of images now covering 99.1 percent of Mars. That is approximately equivalent to the land area of Earth. No other camera ever sent to Mars has photographed so much of the planet in such high resolution.The Context Camera has taken about 90,000 images since the spacecraft began examining Mars from orbit in late 2006. Each one reveals shapes of features down to sizes smaller than a tennis court, in a swath of ground about 18.6 miles (30 kilometers) wide.“Reaching 99.1-percent coverage has been tricky because a number of factors, including weather conditions, coordination with other instruments, downlink limitations, and orbital constraints, tend to limit where we can image and when,” said Context Camera Team Leader Michael Malin of Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.In addition to observing nearly the entire planet at least once, the Context Camera has observed 60.4 percent of the planet more than once. These observations aid science directly and also certify the safety of future landing sites.Malin said, “Single coverage provides a baseline we can use for comparison with future observations, as we look for changes. Re-imaging areas serves two functions: looking for changes and acquiring stereoscopic views from which we can make topographic maps.”A dramatic type of change the Context Camera has documented more than 200 times is a fresh impact crater appearing between the times of two observations. These images enabled scientists to calculate the rate at which small asteroids, or bits of comets, are colliding with Mars. Some of the fresh impacts reveal white material interpreted as water ice. The latitudes and estimated depths of the ice-exposing craters provide evidence about the distribution of buried ice near the surface. MRO’s Shallow Radar has found ice farther underground, but this very shallow ice would go undetected if not for its exposure by impacts.One of MRO’s other cameras, the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), can zoom in on the new impact craters found by the Context Camera. For some of these craters, HiRISE and MRO’s Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars have confirmed the presence of water ice. However, even though MRO has returned more than 300 terabits of science data, the much higher spatial resolution of HiRISE has limited its coverage of Mars’ surface to about three percent. A third MRO camera, the Mars Color Imager, observes almost the entire planet every day to track weather change. Another instrument, the Mars Climate Sounder, records vertical profiles of the atmosphere’s temperatures and suspended particles.The spacecraft was launched Aug. 12, 2005. It entered an elongated orbit of Mars in March 2006, then spent several months using friction with Mars’ upper atmosphere to revise its orbit. Since beginning its science operations in November 2006, MRO has been flying near-polar orbits lasting about two hours, at altitudes from 155 to 196 miles (250 to 316 kilometers). The mission completed its 50,000th orbit on Monday, March 27.“After 11 and a half years in flight, the spacecraft is healthy and remains fully functional,” said MRO Project Manager Dan Johnston at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “It’s a marvelous vehicle that we expect will serve the Mars Exploration Program and Mars science for many more years to come.”On March 22, the mission made the latest adjustment to the orbit, with a 45.1-second burn of six intermediate-size rocket engines, each of which provides 5 pounds (22 newtons) of thrust. This maneuver revised the orbit orientation, so that the spacecraft can be at the right place at the right time, on Nov. 26, 2018, to receive critical radio transmissions from NASA’s InSight Mars lander as it descends to the surface.MRO has already provided more than 60 images from HiRISE for advance analysis of the landing region for InSight. In a broad plain of the Elysium Planitia region of equatorial Mars, InSight will use a seismometer and heat probe to examine the interior of Mars to better understand the formation process of rocky planets like Earth. The final MRO image for assessment of this landing area will be taken Thursday, March 30.For additional information about Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, visit http://nasa.gov/mroFor additional information about InSight, visit http://www.nasa.gov/insight Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Science and Technology JPL’s Prolific Mars Orbiter Completes 50,000 Orbits From JPL/NASA Published on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 | 1:51 pm More Cool Stuffcenter_img Make a comment Herbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Kardashians Know How To Throw A Good Party!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTiger Woods’ Ex Wife Found A New Love PartnerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Reasons Why Ultimatums Are Unhealthy For RelationshipsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Subscribe EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

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Guest Column: Kathryn H. Ross: IT MATTERS | The Shelf Life of Compassion

first_imgHerbeauty10 Female Celebs Women Love But Men Find UnattractiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like An Eye-Candy And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeauty STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week I often fall into moments of resignation. It almost feels like apathy, but heavier. More desperate. Because while apathy has a sometimes attractive lack of care attached to it, resignation holds a lot of care, sucked dry from helplessness. In short, I care a lot about a situation, but I feel so deeply that there’s little if anything I can do, that I fall back into a helpless despair.Maybe that’s acceptance.But there’s no peace in resignation. There’s no moment of surrender that signifies one letting go and letting God. Resignation also connotes abandonment. The closest I can compare it to is the feeling I get when reading Cormac McCarthy’s The Road—that this is a hard narrative to read, and there is probably more truth in it than I want to admit, and as the reader I cannot help the man or the boy or anyone else in any way. I can only watch it unfold and feel awful but know that I can’t—that I shouldn’t—look away.I say all this because I’ve been feeling it pretty profoundly lately. To be honest, when the pandemic “began” I was in survival mode. I immediately stopped leaving my house for any nonessential reason (and admittedly have been policing my family to do the same), distanced whenever I have had to leave, and have picked up a number of hobbies to get me through the frequent moments of boredom and stir-craziness because the only place I’ve been beside the grocery store in the last four months is my house. For a good long while, it felt like the rest of California was doing the same—distancing, staying home, doing our part to flatten the curve. And it seemed like, for a while, the curve was flattened. But then the protests began. And, of course, I’m not speaking of the BLM protests, but the protests in rather affluent areas across California where people began to push back against distancing orders, staying home, and of course, wearing a mask.I remember taking a drive on Mother’s Day to Newport Beach to see the ocean—not get out or go to the ocean, but just see it from the window. My family and I were astonished at the crowds we saw. The further down the coast we went, the more we saw hordes of people milling around without masks. Once we reached San Clemente, there wasn’t a mask in sight until we drove past an open dine-in restaurant crowded with chatting patrons being waited on by masked, frazzled-looking waiters. Remember, this was early May.Another weekend in May we took a drive out to Manhattan Beach and it seemed the virus didn’t exist there either. From our car we saw people out in enormous crowds, a packed beach, and though some people we passed in the street had on masks, the vast majority did not. Of course, Manhattan Beach was one of the areas where the first anti-mask protests had erupted, so I can’t say I’m all that surprised.A few days later George Floyd was murdered and the world exploded.Then came the BLM protests, and to be honest, I’ve had mixed feelings about them. I admit that due to being high risk myself and worries about my parents’ health, I couldn’t justify it to myself to go out and join the throngs in the streets. My mixed feelings are not due to people being out in the middle of a pandemic marching for black lives, but that a situation so horrific happened in the middle of a pandemic (let alone at all) that made it necessary for people to rush the streets in solidarity with black lives. Maybe you won’t like my use of “necessary” attached to these protests. Many people think they’re a pointless waste. My take, though, is that they’ve been important and because of them we’ve seen great change, alongside greater tragedy. A few columns ago I wrote about how absurd and disturbing it was to see headlines of police brutality against black and brown people during a pandemic, but now those headlines and videos are commonplace and they’re garnering smaller and smaller responses.For a few weeks, people cared in a visceral, passionate way about black lives. Social media was alight with posts and petitions. I was having conversations with friends that I never thought possible. Personally,as a black author, I saw engagement and following across my socials jump a considerable amount. But that’s died down, now.At this point you’re probably wondering what the crux of this column is. To put it simply, it’s that in the last four-to-five months we’ve seen the shelf life of compassion in real time. When the pandemic started, people seemed to care—they were (mostly) doing what needed to be done to protect the most vulnerable among us. But as the stay-at-home orders and lockdowns wore on, people got tired. Their compassion waned. And soon freedoms like haircuts and parties and dining out mattered more than the life of another human being. Similarly, when George Floyd was killed the world was horrified and a stunning amount of people from all walks of life began speaking up and speaking out. And though my feeds are still pretty saturated with content on racial injustices, the names of the murdered, issues not found on the local news, and self-care tips, I know most feeds have gone back to normal. People cared, but then they got tired.And I get it. Hearing about race all the time is exhausting. Seeing the horrors of injustice against black people and brown people—especially the subtle injustices that we live with every day, is heartbreaking. If I had the choice to opt out for a while, I probably would take it for some peace of mind, some rest. Similarly, people are tired of being home, of being cooped up. They miss their friends and the normality of life. Masks are uncomfortable and inconvenient. The back to school crisis is overwhelming. All of these feelings are valid. But does this mean we let these discomforts outweigh human lives? Does this mean that once compassion reaches the end of its rope, it’s okay to let it die? Because at least you tried? At least you did something, even if it wasn’t realistic for it to last?Because it seems like that’s what’s happening.To me, the way forward is clear: schools CANNOT reopen and children will learn from home this fall (or as long as is needed) to protect teachers and students and school staff, adults/parents are paid to stay home and work from home. Essential workers are given paid leave should they need it and reasonable time off so they aren’t pushed to make a choice between their job and their health. Rent is frozen and evictions suspended. We wear masks no matter what and savor the sweet relief of removing them in the car or at home like many have removed a bra after a long day. Our leader wears his mask and pushes his followers to do the same. We care about people, and do hard things born of that care. No matter who these people are, even if we think they don’t deserve it, we care. We do not put the economy and money over human lives. We can’t.I don’t want to live in a world where four months of compassion is too much. Where four months of discomfort is too high a price to pay for the health and safety of another. My resignation tells me that the world that’s opposite of this current one isn’t possible, and no matter what I do or say or write, people aren’t going to care and there’s nothing I can do about it. People are going to value their own lives and comfort more than some nameless, faceless member of the population they’ve never met and have no tie to. And though so many of us are still doing the hard work to ensure black lives matter, to ensure children are freed from cages and families reunited, to ensure our Asian brothers and sisters are no longer discriminated against for this pandemic they did not cause, to ensure sacred land is respected and indigenous peoples are valued, to ensure that LGTBQA+ people are protected, cared for, and seen, too many of us are not. And one of the main reasons for the lack of care is because compassion is draining and tiresome and long-suffering. And humans aren’t built for that.But you know what? We have the capacity for it. We have the capacity for it and so much more. So, can I invite you to be selfless? To be uncomfortable for a little longer? To be exhausted? Because, usually, hard things are worth doing. Good things are not easy. Right things are not easy.As someone who’s walked with Christ her whole life, such a lesson is ground into my spirit—the right thing is hard, uncomfortable, exhausting. But you don’t have to be a believer or agree with me to do this. You can still choose to put others before yourself even if every part of your being says that doesn’t make sense. Because in the end it’s just as human to care as it is to be selfish, and it takes our intellect—our choice—to be better to actually be better.So yeah, I’m feeling resigned. Big time. But I’m choosing not to act resigned. I’m choosing to keep talking and writing and doing because I believe it’s the right thing to do. Caring about others in the time of racial unrest, of political revelation, of global disease is the right thing to do, and we have to act on it.So please, let’s let our compassion last far longer than it’s easy to act on it, because short-lived compassion isn’t really compassion at all. Top of the News 79 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribe Community News CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img Community News More Cool Stuff Make a comment Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Opinion & Columnists Guest Column: Kathryn H. Ross: IT MATTERS | The Shelf Life of Compassion By KATHRYN H. ROSS Published on Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | 3:31 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img read more

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[Breaking]After Kerala HC, Now Bombay HC To Live Stream Court Hearings From Tomorrow On “Trial Basis” [Read Press Note]

first_imgNews Updates[Breaking]After Kerala HC, Now Bombay HC To Live Stream Court Hearings From Tomorrow On “Trial Basis” [Read Press Note] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK8 April 2020 8:23 AMShare This – xThe Bombay has decided to live stream court hearing on a “trial basis”. For this, the bench of Justice GS Patel will make the hearing of listed matters on 9th April 2020, publicly accessible.It may be noted that presently, the High Court of Kerala is the only court in India which has successfully started live-streaming of court hearings through the Zoom App. The hearing in…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Bombay has decided to live stream court hearing on a “trial basis”. For this, the bench of Justice GS Patel will make the hearing of listed matters on 9th April 2020, publicly accessible.It may be noted that presently, the High Court of Kerala is the only court in India which has successfully started live-streaming of court hearings through the Zoom App. The hearing in Justice Patel’s  Court may be accessed by anyone and everyone via the Zoom app/plugin, thorough the video link viz., https://zoom.us/j/427322355, without any password. Pertinently, the virtual court room can accommodate at most 500 participants and thus it is advised that those who are not advocates appearing in the listed matters should yield to the advocates whose matters are listed. However, the court has cautioned that though virtual, it is nonetheless a court hearing, and therefore appropriate court conduct is required. Accordingly the press release states: There is to be no recording under any circumstances and violation of this direction will invite stringent action;All those attending the hearing must maintain silence and all microphones, except those of the advocates addressing the Court, must be muted;Advocates are expected to be in sober attire. While formal court attire is not expected, but is optional (without a gown) and no enquiries as to what constitutes ‘sober attire’ will be entertained by the court.There are no ‘fixed times’ for listed matters and they will be taken serially like a regular court hearing.  Further, the hosts and co-hosts have been authorized to remove without notice or warning any persons who violate these conditions.The cause list for Justice GS Patel’s court tomorrow is attached with the press note below. Read Press Note Next Storylast_img read more

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Government heavily criticised over false dawns on Mica Redress

first_img WhatsApp FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 AudioHomepage BannerNews By News Highland – January 29, 2020 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Government heavily criticised over false dawns on Mica Redress Facebook Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp Twitter Google+center_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th It’s emerged that some homeowners affected by mica in Donegal have resorted to carrying out repair works themselves because they’re fed up waiting on the redress scheme. Despite indications that the Government may announce more details on the scheme later this week, the local authority has stated that it would still be months before applications are even processed.The Council says their hands are effectively tied until the rollout is initiated at national level.Cllr Liam Blaney says homes affected in Limerick went down the pyrite redress route with work already underway and without homeowners having to contribute the controversial 10%.He believes that in hindsight, that would have been a better way forward:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/blanedfgdfgdfymicawed.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Google+ Previous article‘Serious sewerage problems’ in south Inishowen estatesNext articleOver two thousand properties without power in Glenties News Highland Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic last_img read more

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Hawaii’s Supreme Court approves controversial Thirty-Meter Telescope despite protests from natives

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(HONOLULU) — Hawaii’s Supreme Court made a decision on a long-debated issue by voting in favor of continuing the construction of a large telescope on the Mauna Kea volcano, a mountain that’s considered sacred to native Hawaiians.The court voted on Tuesday in favor of the state’s Board of Land and Natural Resources’ decision in 2017 to grant a construction permit to build the Thirty-Meter Telescope, also known as TMT.“We’re pleased the court carefully considered and weighed all the varied and passionate testimony about TMT,” Hawaiian Governor David Ige said in a statement on Tuesday. “We believe this decision is fair and right and will continue to keep Hawai‘i at the forefront of astronomy.”The decision follows years of litigation in courts and protests from Native Hawaiians, many of whom fear that the impending project will desecrate a spiritual space, according to ABC affiliate KITV.In response to the persistent opposition, which is only expected to intensify with the court’s decision, TMT spokesperson Scott Ishikawa stressed that the company would do its best to be good to the mountain.“I think everybody understands now that it is a special place — that everyone has to take their own responsibility of taking care of her,” Ishikawa said.David Lassner, president of the University of Hawaii, which has backed the construction of TMT, added in the governor’s statement: “We will ensure that this project is accomplished appropriately and with the deepest respect for the awesomeness of Mauna Kea.”Now that construction on TMT has been approved, the benchmark $1.4 billion dollar project is one step closer to its projected 2029 completion.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Disgraced estate agent who stole £357,000 told to pay back £1

first_imgAn estate agent who stole £357,000 from landlords and tenants and left suppliers and staff out of pocket after getting into financial difficulties has been ordered to pay just £1 back.Clifford Wheatcroft (pictured, below) opened his Bournemouth lettings agency Real-Est8 Property Solutions in 2009 but by 2012 it was in financial difficulties and he began using tenants’ deposits and rent payments to keep his business afloat.Real-Est8 eventually went into administration and Wheatcroft initially told police that the business had got into difficulties after he lost a big landlord client.The former estate agent’s business model was also said to have been a contributing factor; Real-Est8 charged landlords just £50 a month per property for a tenant finding and deposit/rent collections service.But ‘lengthy and complicated’ investigations by Dorset police found that the then 35-year-old had spent much of the cash on holidays and shopping sprees.In February last year he was sentenced to 17 months in prison suspended for two years and told to complete 250 hours of unpaid work after admitting eight counts of theft.But financial investigations by the Crown Prosecution Service have failed to find any of the missing cash and Wheatcroft has now been told to pay a token £1 under the Proceeds of Crime Act.At a hearing earlier this week Wheatcroft was warned by Stephen Climie QC at Bournemouth Crown Court that the Proceeds of Crime Order would stay with him ‘for life’ until the debt was repaid.“Should he receive a boost in his financial circumstances it will be allowed for some of the money to be reclaimed to pay off the debt,” Mr Climie said.“He is not getting away with just paying £1 and it’s important that is known at a public hearing.” Real-Est8 Property Solutions Bournemouth Crown Court Clifford Wheatcroft estate agent March 27, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Disgraced estate agent who stole £357,000 told to pay back £1 previous nextAgencies & PeopleDisgraced estate agent who stole £357,000 told to pay back £1Clifford Wheatcroft’s Bournemouth agency collapsed in 2013 after it was discovered that he had used tenant deposits and rent payments to support a ‘lavish lifestyle’.Nigel Lewis27th March 201903,391 Viewslast_img read more

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U.S. Seventh Fleet Command Ship, USS Blue Ridge Arrives in Tomakomai

first_img View post tag: ship View post tag: Arrives U.S. Seventh Fleet Command Ship, USS Blue Ridge Arrives in Tomakomai View post tag: Seventh View post tag: News by topic Share this article View post tag: blue View post tag: USS View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval February 6, 2012 Back to overview,Home naval-today U.S. Seventh Fleet Command Ship, USS Blue Ridge Arrives in Tomakomai View post tag: fleet Training & Education View post tag: Ridge View post tag: Command View post tag: U.S. U.S. Seventh Fleet command ship, USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), arrived in Tomakomai, Feb. 3 for a goodwill port visit.During the visit, Sailors from Blue Ridge, embarked 7th Fleet staff and Marines from Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team-Pacific (FAST-PAC) plan to interact with local children at the Tomakomai Ice Skating Festival.The 7th Fleet Band is scheduled to perform at the festival, along with scheduled performances at the 63rd Annual Sapporo Snow and Ice Festival, Chitose Outlet Mall and Aeon Shopping Center.“The crew is very excited to visit the Hokkaido region during this very popular season with amazing local events,” said Blue Ridge Commanding Officer Capt. Daniel Grieco. “Blue Ridge does not get the opportunity to visit this prefecture and specifically Tomakomai very often and it is a great opportunity for our Sailors to get out and meet the wonderful people here, experience all the exceptional cultural opportunities such as the Skate Festival, Sapporo Snow Festival and unique regional cuisine.”For some Blue Ridge crewmembers this will be the second port visit in the northernmost prefecture of Japan, Hokkaido. In Hokkaido, the city of Sapporo is the renowned location for the Annual Sapporo Snow and Ice Festival. Beyond the fascination of snow and ice sculptures, which draw tourists from around the world, Sapporo also offers great winter sports activities such as skiing, snowboarding and sledding to visiting Sailors and Marines.“My mom has told me that going to the ice festival in Sapporo is going to be the best experience of my life,” said Electrician’s Mate Fireman Alexis Hardwick. “I am very excited about getting the chance to see the festival.”Blue Ridge serves under Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 7/Task Force 76, the Navy’s only forward-deployed amphibious force. Blue Ridge is the flagship for Commander, 7th Fleet. Task Force 76 is headquartered at White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa with an operating detachment in Sasebo.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , February 06, 2012; Image: navy View post tag: Tomakomailast_img read more

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Oxfess and Oxlove admins take pages offline after abuse

first_imgThe admins of Facebook pages Oxfess and Oxlove have taken the pages down after targeted anonymous submissions about them.The pages – who are administered by the same team – had grown hugely in popularity since their inception last year. The Oxlove page had over 9,000 likes on Facebook, with Oxfess having around 10,500.However, they were both taken down from Facebook on Tuesday afternoon following a set of abusive submissions.One of the admins told Cherwell: “I’m not sure if Oxlove and Oxfess are returning – there were submissions targeting me and the other admin about our roles on the page in a particularly nasty way.“We run Oxlove and Oxfess in a way that we think improves the Oxford community as a place to spread the love and discuss problems with the institutions anonymously, taking up quite a lot of time.“We are much less willing to that if we get lots of anonymous attacks on our positions as admins.”Oxlove, which was created last year following the success of Cambridge-based page Crushbridge, allowed students to anonymously submit posts declaring their love for other students.A few weeks after Oxlove’s inception, the admins created Oxfess, which received widespread attention and praise after lifting the lid on student mental health in an unexpected way.Both pages received between 150 and 200 submissions a day, and had a post reach of between 100,000 and 200,000 views per week.In a June 2017 interview with Cherwell, one of the pages’ admins said: “I realised there would be some mental health stuff [on Oxfess], but I didn’t realise the extent to which it would be the case.“It’s nice that people feel that there’s a place to talk about these things.”Oxford’s third major anonymous submissions page, Oxfeud, has been inactive since January, after receiving constant criticism for allegedly providing a platform for hate speech.last_img read more

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YESTERYEAR: Tex Justus and the Texas Cowboys by Pat Sides

first_imgOlus “Tex” Justus entertained Tri-Staters for more than three decades as host of “T. J. Time,” a morning program featuring “old time” country music on Boonville’s WBNL radio station. A native of Texas, Justus made his singing debut in 1936 in Louisville. A few years later, he organized a dance band named the Texas Cowboys and settled in Owensboro. Justus joined the WGBF radio staff in Evansville in the late 1940s before he started broadcasting in Boonville four years later. Wearing his trademark cowboy hat, he appeared at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville and was inducted into the Country Music Disc Jockey Hall of Fame in 1988, three years after his death in Evansville.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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