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Can the Aviva share price keep on climbing?

first_img Image source: Getty Images Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Zaven Boyrazian I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Enter Your Email Address But I did spot cheaper growth stock that looks far more promising… FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge The Aviva (LSE:AV) share price has been on a roll recently. Over the past 12 months, it has increased by over 50%, and the stock is now trading near pre-pandemic levels.Can the Aviva share price continue its upward momentum though? And is it too late to add the business to my portfolio? 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Aviva’s rising share priceAviva is a financial services firm that specialises predominantly in life insurance and pension products. The business charges its insurance customers premiums and its investment customers service fees. But that’s not actually how this company generates profits.Like all insurance companies, Aviva uses its operational cash flow to invest in various financial instruments, including shares. It then subsequently uses the returns on these investments to cover claim expenses and grow the business in general. So when the stock market crashed in March 2020, Aviva took a significant hit to its investment portfolios and even had to cancel its full-year dividends.Since then, the stock market and, subsequently the Aviva share price, have begun to recover. What’s more, the company is shifting its strategy to only focus on the UK, Irish, and Canadian markets. And so, throughout 2020, it began disposing of its international operations in Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Turkey, and more recently, France and Italy.These disposals provided a surge in cash on the balance sheet and also enabled the dividend to return, with the next ex-dividend date set for 8 April.Risks to considerRunning an insurance business is a relatively risky endeavour. The monthly insurance premiums paid by an individual rarely cover the costs if a claim is made (although, of course, not all customers make claims). A simple solution to this problem would be to charge higher premiums. But with so many other competing insurance businesses for customers to choose from, Aviva’s pricing power is virtually non-existent.Beyond its insurance business, the firm is also exposed to risks revolving around medical innovations. Average life expectancy has been steadily increasing over the past 40 years due to general healthcare improvements. However, this has added pressure to Aviva’s pension products. For example, annuities have become far less lucrative over the years — a trend that will likely continue over the long term.To mitigate these risks, Aviva uses those aforementioned investments to grow its capital. But consequently, this exposes it to market risk, which can cause severe financial damage, as perfectly demonstrated last year. The volatility in its investments has also led to an inconsistent dividend track record, with cuts being made multiple times even before the pandemic.The bottom lineThe disposal of most of its international operations has flooded the business with fresh capital that could lead to substantial future growth. And even though Aviva’s share price has significantly risen these past few months, it is still trading at a P/E ratio of around 8. Comparing that to its industry average of 12.5, the stock does look undervalued to me.Therefore, over the short-term, I think it is possible for the Aviva share price to keep on climbing. But its long-term growth potential is tied to the new strategy which remains unproven for now. So, I won’t be adding Aviva to my portfolio today. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Zaven Boyrazian | Wednesday, 24th March, 2021 | More on: AV Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Zaven Boyrazian does not own shares in Aviva. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Can the Aviva share price keep on climbing?last_img read more

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Episcopal bishops bring church’s calls for gun reform to congressional…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls By David PaulsenPosted Feb 28, 2019 Gun Violence Rector Albany, NY Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishops United Against Gun Violence, Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal bishops bring church’s calls for gun reform to congressional visits on Capitol Hillcenter_img Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Faith & Politics, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Jack Cobb of the Office of Government Relations leads a group of bishops that include retired Connecticut Bishop Suffragan Jim Curry, Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe and Washington Assisting Bishop Chilton Knudsen. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] It was the best of days and the worst of days for eight Episcopal bishops to be on Capitol Hill pressing lawmakers to pass new gun safety measures.Much of the oxygen in the nation’s capital on Feb. 27 was being sucked up by the daylong testimony of President Donald Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, his face on TVs all over Capitol Hill as he called his old boss a racist, a conman and a cheat. But beyond the day’s top political story, an unrelated House vote provided a timely backdrop for the bishops’ advocacy.The bill, known as H.R. 8, would expand background checks for gun purchases, one of the reforms that Bishops United Against Gun Violence points to as a common-sense measure with widespread support, despite the well-funded opposition of gun rights groups like the National Rifle Association.“Silence on this is complicity,” Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas told Episcopal News Service during a break in the day’s schedule of meetings with lawmakers and their staffs. “If we’re silent, other people can frame the discourse.”Bishops United is a network of about 80 Episcopal bishops that formed in the wake of the 2012 massacre of 26 children and educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Douglas, one of the conveners, still carries with him the memory of that horrific day and its grim aftermath – part of the personal narrative he shares on Capitol Hill to help frame the discourse – though the tragically long list of mass shootings since Sandy Hook supplies the bishops with ample additional examples when calling for legislative action.The bishops’ day kicked off at 9 a.m. with a closed-door presentation on the pending legislation by Rep. Bobby Scott, a Virginia Democrat, in a conference room at the United Methodist Building across the street from the Capitol.Rep @BobbyScott to members of Bishops United: Thank you for what you do. It’s important. Thank you for telling us about the people you represent. #BishopsOnTheHill #EpiscopalAdvocacy pic.twitter.com/iaiGA8nqAV— The Cross Lobby (@TheCrossLobby) February 27, 2019After Scott left, The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, which has offices in the building, provided the bishops’ with detailed guidance for an effective day on Capitol Hill. “We want to be here for you, and we want to support the tremendous work that you’re already doing,” said Office of Government Relations Director Rebecca Blachly, whose staff coordinated the congressional meetings and, in most cases, accompanied the bishops from office to office.Washington Bishop Mariann Budde sat in on the introductory sessions, though she would not be participating in the day’s rounds. She and Douglas were joined by six other bishops. Vermont Bishop Tom Ely had not yet arrived, having scheduled his own Capitol Hill visits with Vermont’s congressional delegation.Jack Cobb of the Office of Government Relations coaches the bishops on their upcoming visits with congressional offices during an introductory session Feb. 27 held at the United Methodist Building on Capitol Hill. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceJack Cobb, who tracks domestic policy issues for the Office of Government Relations, highlighted H.R. 8 but also drew the bishops’ attention to H.R. 1112, which seeks to extend the background check waiting period and close what has been called the “Charleston loophole,” exploited by Dylann Roof to purchase the guns used in the killing of seven people in 2015 at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.Cobb noted that legislation is particularly important to Rep. Jim Clyburn, whom the bishops were scheduled to meet with in the afternoon. Clyburn is the House majority whip and a Democrat from South Carolina whose father was a preacher.The 2015 massacre “could have been his church,” Cobb said. “It’s his backyard, and it’s his bill.”What else should the bishops know? The lines into congressional office buildings are often long, so arrive early, Cobb said. At the same time, “members of Congress will often be late.” Many of the meetings would be with lawmakers’ staffs, who will take notes and summarize the meeting in memos to be read later by their bosses.Try to reference any local connections individual bishops have with the lawmakers, Cobb said. Although Long Island Bishop Lawrence Provenzano wasn’t part of these meetings, the bishops should acknowledge Provenzano’s support while meeting with Rep. Peter King, the Long Island Republican, who was a co-sponsor on H.R. 8.For King and other Republicans who broke with their party to support the legislation, “this is a thank you meeting,” Cobb said. “We want them to know they are supported.”To cap their meetings, the bishops were encouraged to provide the lawmakers’ offices with printed materials about Bishops United and The Episcopal Church’s positions on gun violence.Making the rounds on Capitol HillThe Episcopal Church’s advocacy for stricter regulations dates back more than four decades, with General Convention regularly passing resolutions supporting various gun control measures, most recently a resolution last year calling on the federal government to study gun violence as a public health issue.A 1976 resolution took a general stance supporting legislation “aimed at controlling the sale and use of hand guns.” A follow-up resolution in 1991 specifically backed the Brady Bill, which was passed and became law in 1993, establishing waiting periods and background checks for handgun purchases.The Brady Bill and a temporary assault weapons ban in 1994 would be the last significant gun control measures to clear Congress.H.R. 8 was scheduled Feb. 27 for an afternoon vote and likely approval in the House, where Democrats hold the majority, boosting the spirits of the bishops as they prepared to begin their rounds, though Cobb tempered their optimism.“In the Senate is where it will have trouble,” Cobb said, explaining that Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had “zero incentive” to put the Senate’s companion bill, 42, on the agenda for debate.Office of Government Relations Director Rebecca Blachly, left, leads a group of former diocesan bishops: Bishop Joe Doss of New Jersey, Bishop Mark Beckwith of Newark and Bishop Dan Edwards of Nevada. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAfter a brief prayer by Douglas, the bishops split into two groups and headed to their respective appointments. Blachly, walking past the Supreme Court toward the House office buildings, led a group that included three former diocesan bishops, Bishop Mark Beckwith of Newark, Bishop Joe Doss of New Jersey and Bishop Dan Edwards of Nevada. Cobb headed in the opposite direction to the Russell Senate Office Building followed by Douglas, Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe, retired Bishop Suffragan Jim Curry of Connecticut and Bishop Chilton Knudsen, mere days into her new role as assisting bishop in the Diocese of Washington.ENS was not granted access inside any of the meetings at lawmakers’ offices but was able to follow Cobb’s group and interview the bishops throughout the morning as they traveled around Capitol Hill, stopping at three Senate offices.Duncan-Probe admitted early on that she had not expected to take the lead in any of the day’s meetings, given that she is one of the newer members of Bishops United, but she accepted that lead role during her group’s first stop, at the offices of New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democrat who also is running for president.Their meeting was scheduled for 10:45 a.m., but Gillibrand’s representatives were running late because of a meeting at the Capitol. They arrived at 11:13 a.m. and ushered the bishops down the hall and into a meeting room, where Duncan-Probe prepared to kick things off.The door closed. Time from greeting to end of meeting: 21 minutes.Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe prepares to lead her group’s discussion Feb. 27 with staff members of New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s office. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“Excellent job,” Curry said to Duncan-Probe afterward, as the group shuffled along to their next appointment.“I was talking fast because I was nervous,” Duncan-Probe said, but also because she wanted to thoroughly summarize the bishops’ position. “I was trying to figure out the sound bite I wanted her to take back to Kirsten. … We’re a voting bloc.”Duncan-Probe elaborated later that her diocese is “struggling with the diversity of this issue.” Episcopalians in Central New York include hunters, military veterans and others who are comfortable around guns, as well as liberal-minded Episcopalians who may never have even held a gun, much less shot one.“Across the diocese there’s a commitment to having a safe society and a just society,” Duncan-Probe said, even if individuals don’t always agree on the particular approaches.Jack Cobb and the bishops watch the Michael Cohen testimony on TV as they wait for their next meeting Feb. 27 in the office of Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceCobb led the group to a basement corridor so they could pass underground into the Hart Senate Office Building.“Our other meeting has” – he looked at his watch – “started. So we need to keep moving.”The bishops had hoped to meet in person with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, a Democrat from Rhode Island and a fellow Episcopalian, but he was tied up in a committee meeting. As Cobb’s group waited in Whitehouse’s office, they glanced at a TV that was tuned to CNN and the Cohen hearing.At 11:42 a.m., Whitehouse’s legal counsel Ches Garrison arrived and invited the bishops into a meeting room. Curry took the lead this time. Afterward, they all posed for a group photo.Meeting duration: 31 minutes.“We’re dealing with allies,” Curry told ENS on the way out. Trying to persuade a senator or representative to change a “no” vote to a “yes” is important, but Curry said it also is necessary to support those already fighting for reform. “We weren’t saying anything new, and yet we’re received with a sense of gratitude, that we are doing this work.”The Bishops United group poses for a photo with Ches Garrison, legal counsel for Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, after their meeting Feb. 27. From left are Jack Cobb of the Office of Government Relations, retired Connecticut Bishop Suffragan Jim Curry, Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, Garrison, Washington Assisting Bishop Chilton Knudsen and Douglas’ wife, Kristin Harris. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceBishops embrace anti-violence mission, impossible to ignoreTheir last stop before lunch was the office of Sen. Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut.“Oh, great. Time for me to go to work,” Douglas said. He took the lead when a woman with Murphy’s staff greeted them and led them to a meeting room.As they met, the Cohen testimony continued on the TV near the office’s entrance, this one tuned to MSNBC. Nearby, a map of Connecticut features tiny pins placed across the state, put there by the many people who have come to visit the senator’s office. Four individuals entered the office and placed an additional pin on Sandy Hook. They were from Newtown Action Alliance and had come for their own meeting.The Bishops United group chats Feb. 27 with the Rev. Michele Morgan, rector of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill, who was visiting Sen. Chris Murphy’s office as part of a group from Newtown Action Alliance. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceWhen the bishops wrapped up – 24 minutes – they greeted the Newtown group like old friends. One of them was the Rev. Michele Morgan, of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill, who is active on gun violence issues in Washington. Another was Eric Milgram, whose daughter was a first-grader at Sandy Hook at the time of the massacre and survived.“Are you pounding the pavement?” Newtown Action Alliance Chairwoman Po Murray asked.“Oh, yeah,” Douglas replied.At lunch back at the United Methodist Building, Douglas told ENS he always begins conversations on these issues by saying he never intended it to be part of his agenda when he became bishop, but it became unavoidable after Dec. 12, 2012. St. John’s Episcopal Church next to Sandy Hook Elementary School became a site for community grieving after the massacre, and on a more personal level, Douglas felt the impact of the rampage directly during a service for Ben Wheeler, one of the young victims whose family attended Trinity Episcopal Church in Newtown.“I made a commitment to his parents, that this would be part of my vocation and my ministry as long as I’m bishop,” Douglas said.He thinks Murphy feels the same, but in the role of a lawmaker instead of a religious leader. Murphy was the congressman representing Newtown at the time of the shooting, and now as senator, he is the lead sponsor of the Senate bill seeking to expand background checks.After lunch, most of the bishops left for the Capitol to meet with Clyburn, the majority whip. Ely, after sharing a meal with his fellow bishops, parted ways to see his home-state senator, Patrick Leahy, a Democrat. But when Ely arrived in Leahy’s office, the office TV was tuned not to the Cohen hearing but to Leahy’s floor speech in the Senate on climate change. Was Leahy unavailable to meet in person?Moments later, Leahy senior adviser Kevin McDonald arrived and reassured Ely that the senator was waiting to meet the bishop over in the Capitol. “This is [Leahy’s] biggest meeting of the day,” McDonald said.Meanwhile, as the House debated the background check bill, Douglas and Knudsen made their way to the lawn on the east side of the Capitol, where celebratory gatherings were planned for the bill’s expected passage. The Newtown Action Alliance representatives met them there.Bishops United would spend much of Feb. 28 meeting with Newtown Action Alliance and other partners in the fight against gun violence as the bishops plot the network’s future path. Their week culminates March 1 with a noon prayer service that will be streamed live on Facebook.On Feb. 27, news broke around 4 p.m. that H.R. 8 cleared the House by a vote of 240-190, and lawmakers began pouring out of the Capitol for photo-ops, some in front of the Capitol’s steps and others on the lawn. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined a crowd of bill supporters and posed for photos with them standing next to Rep. Lucy McBath, a freshman Democrat from Georgia whose son was shot and killed in 2012. (The House would pass Clyburn’s “Charleston loophole” bill the next day.)Douglas, Knudsen and the group from Newtown Action Alliance gravitated to a nearby spot on the Capitol steps where members of the Connecticut congressional delegation, including Murphy, had gathered to herald the House [email protected] speaks with his state’s senators @SenBlumenthal and @ChrisMurphyCT in the wake of the House passing #HR8 on universal background checks. #BishopsOnTheHill #EpiscopalAdvocacy pic.twitter.com/ViCHlItxOx— The Cross Lobby (@TheCrossLobby) February 27, 2019Murphy vowed to work toward passage in the Senate as well, while acknowledging that progress on gun reform has long been an uphill battle.“This is an advertisement for why elections matter,” the senator said. “This is an advertisement for why persistent political action matters. Big social change doesn’t happen overnight. You hit obstacles. You fail before you succeed.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Public Policy Network, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

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Church and Stage: Producing Theater for Education, Praxis, Outreach, and Fundraising

first_img Howard Lake | 20 January 2008 | News  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Church and Stage: Producing Theater for Education, Praxis, Outreach, and Fundraisinglast_img read more

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JP candidates stake their claim

first_img Twitter JP candidates stake their claim WhatsApp By admin – February 21, 2018 Local NewsGovernment Pinterest Twitter Previous articleHIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL: Odessa High turns to pitching for guiding light in 2018Next articleGOOD NEWS: Jack Hendrix Competition Winners admin Facebook Facebook Pinterest Top row from left: Steven Westfall, Sheryl Jones, Missi Walden.Bottom row from left: Matthew Stringer, Marvin Jennings, Gary Dunda. Not pictured: Jet Brown. Ector County residents learned about the seven justice of the peace candidates and their platforms, and about the office itself, during a forum Wednesday night hosted by the Ector County Republican Women.The seven candidates running for the office are Matthew Stringer, Jet Brown, Sheryl Jones, Missi Walden, Steven Westfall, Marvin Jennings and Gary Dunda. They are running to fill the empty seat of precinct 2, vacated by Judge Christopher Clark when he was appointed as County Court at Law No. 2 Judge.Early voting began Tuesday for the March primary, but as there will likely be a run-off in May, voters will likely have more time to learn about the remaining candidates contesting for the vacant seat.The candidates were cordial with each other throughout their statements and the Q&A session afterwards, as each stated their reasoning for wanting the office and what they would do in the position.Stringer focused on accountability and transparency in his speech, stumping for a proposed yearly report showing exactly what his office did, how many cases were processed, and what their budget was.“I will constantly strive to promote the people’s confidence in our local judiciary, and I will bring my small business background and proven conservative record to be a visible force working to address the needs of our criminal justice infrastructure,” Stringer told those in attendance. “The rights of the people and public safety depends upon it.”When asked by an audience member what other work he’s held outside of his family’s jewelry store, Stringer didn’t directly answer the question posed, but expanded on his part in starting his family’s business, Diamonds in Midland.“I’ve been involved in every area of growing a small business from a 750 square foot location located on the wrong way of a one-way in a small town, Alpine, Texas, grew it into a 4,200 square foot store in Midland, Texas that did hundreds of thousands of dollars in sales,” Stringer said. “Whenever you have a small business, you realize that it consumes so much of your time in your life and it’s a major sacrifice.”On the opposite end of that spectrum is Brown, who told the crowd on his experience as a CEO of Permian Truck and an owner of a consulting firm. Brown said that, with his other jobs, he would be setting his own schedule in the seat, but not to expect him to be taking any time off. He told the crowd in the last sixteen years, he’s taken two weeks of vacation,When asked by an audience member if he looked at the seat as a part-time job, Brown said he didn’t see it that way, as the justice of the peace would also need to be available during nights and weekends, giving an anecdote on doing business over the phone from 2 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. the previous night.“Anything I do is not a part-time job,” Brown said. “Whatever needs to be done, I do.”Brown said that, should he be elected, there would be people set in place to take some of his duties. He also pointed out that his work is done remotely over the computer or the phone and wouldn’t take up much time.Jones talked to the crowd about her experience in law enforcement as a patrol officer for the Odessa Police Department and her time interacting with justices as a juvenile investigator, and previously educated various law enforcement agencies on utilizing a criminal information database.“I feel that I will be your full-time, committed judge,” Jones said. “I’ll be in the office five days a week, it is a full-time job.”Walden told the crowd of her background working in the courtroom, a qualification she alone has among the candidates. She said she’s been in the legal field for 27 years, working as a legal assistant at the Shafer Law Firm before moving to the Ector County Courthouse to become the court coordinator for the 244th District Court before transitioning to the 161st District Court.“I have been involved in thousands of hearings and trials throughout the last 13 years,” Walden said. “I have the experience to do what needs to be done in the justice of the peace court.”Walden said her main goal in the position would be to make the court as paperless as possible, a transition she said she has already gone through in the 161st District Court.Westfall, the youngest candidate at 26, told the audience how he would like to improve the office by making himself available to the public. He said his main way of doing this would be by making his office open to the public during lunch hours, which he would be able to do due to each justice running their office independently.“I want to make myself available to the public 24/7, five days a week,” Westfall said.“I’m just an old cowboy up here, I’m not a politician,” Jennings said. “Justice is supposed to be blind, and I look at everybody the same. I want to be fair to each and every one.”Jennings brought up his past, when he faced criminal charges including assault, injury to a child and theft. But he said that those charges were dropped, and were involved in a custody issue related to his ex-wife. The last candidate to speak was Dunda, 79, who told the senior citizens they still had much to give. He stressed to the crowd that the justice of the peace had a simple court, overseeing misdemeanors and eviction cases, and talked about his time serving as a game warden out of Ector County and as an Ector County constable.“I don’t care if you’re a republican or a democrat, rich or poor, I will treat you with integrity, honesty and fairness,” Dunda said.Few questions were asked after the candidates’ statements. The final question asked to each candidate was simply what the job actually entailed. Four of the candidates summarized the position: It entails hearing class C misdemeanor cases, like traffic tickets, small claim civil cases with a jurisdictional limit of $10,000, like land lord and tenant disputes, and they may also wed couples wishing to marry.Early voting for the March primary will continue until March 2, and Election Day is March 6, with polls open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.More CoverageSeven candidates vie for JP officeIf You Go2018 Election FactsFirst day of early voting: Feb. 20.Last day of early voting: March 2.Election Day: March 6. WhatsApplast_img read more

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TxDOT distracted driving campaign coming through Midland

first_img Twitter More Information By admin – April 13, 2018 Pinterest Local News TxDOT distracted driving campaign coming through Midland In 2017, the total number of vehicle traffic crashes on Texas roads was 537,475. Of those, 100,687 or 19 percent involved distracted driving.The 100,687 distracted-driving crashes in Texas resulted in 444 deaths and 2,889 serious injuries.The number of crashes involving distracted driving in Texas decreased by 8 percent from 2016 to 2017 and the number of fatalities decreased by 3 percent, but we still lost 444 lives so there is clearly a need for drivers to continue changing their behaviors.In Texas, distracted driving-related crashes and fatalities are highest among drivers ages 16 to 24. In an effort to battle distracted driving, the Texas Department of Transportation is spreading its ‘Heads up, Texas’ campaign across the state, bringing with it a virtual reality booth to 19 cities, including to Midland on May 1.Pushing recent findings and new statistics, TxDOT is partnering with AT&T’s It Can Wait campaign in efforts to encourage Texans to put away their cell phones and stay attentive while behind the steering wheel.In Texas in 2017, at least 19 percent of all vehicle crashes in the state involved distracted driving, according to a TxDOT news release.The traveling virtual reality experience at the center of the campaign will make its way to the area at the Midland RockHounds’ home game May 1.“Basically, it’s like a huge video game of one type or another, to teach people the dangers of driving distracted,” said Odessa District of TxDOT public information officer Gene Powell.Powell said the dangers of distracted driving are just as prevalent in Odessa and throughout the Permian Basin as they are in other places.In Odessa in 2017, there were 243 crashes attributed to distracted driving, with 14 resulting in serious injuries. Through the district’s 12 area counties, there were 1,446 crashes attributed to distracted driving in 2017, resulting in 14 fatalities and 51 serious injuries.“From what we can prove, we know 19 percent of all crashes are caused by distracted driving, so if people are serious about being safe, if people are serious about improving safety on the roads, you can knock out a fifth of all crashes by not driving distracted,” Powell said. “That’d be a huge step in the right direction.”This spring, TxDOT hopes to get Texans moving into that direction.“This is the time of year when people are thinking about getting out in the sun, going and having fun, going on vacations, getting weekend trips, all those kinds of things. And we just take it for granted that, ‘It’s not going to happen to us,’ but last year, there were 10 people a day killed in crashes on Texas roads, and I guarantee you they all thought it couldn’t happen to them,” Powell said.“We have to protect ourselves, we have to watch out for other drivers, we have to protect our families. That’s why we do so many of these campaigns.”TxDOT distracted driver statistics Facebookcenter_img Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Heads up, Texas: Talk, Text, Crash. AT&T It Can Wait. Pinterest Previous articleMarfa Myths gets underway todayNext articleCHAREN: When $63 million doesn’t buy working toilets adminlast_img read more

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Bipartisan Bill Introduced In Congress Aimed At Preventing Fed Bailouts

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Bipartisan Bill Introduced In Congress Aimed At Preventing Fed Bailouts Previous: Bill Passes House With Amendment Barring DOJ From Funding Disparate Impact Claims Next: Single-Family Rental Market Experiencing Shift Toward South and Midwest Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago  Print This Post Tagged with: Bailouts Federal Reserve Too Big to Fail U.S. House of Representatives Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Brian Honea Share Save Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agocenter_img Three weeks after a bipartisan bill was introduced in the U.S. Senate to limit the Federal Reserve’s authority to bail out big banks, similar bipartisan legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives, according to an announcement on Representative Scott Garrett’s (R-New Jersey) website.Garrett and Mike Capuano (D-Massachusetts) introduced H.R. 2625, also known as the Bailout Prevention Act (BPA) of 2015 in response to the Fed’s perceived failure to make any meaningful changes with regards to implementing certain provisions of Dodd-Frank that would limit the Fed’s broad powers.The BPA would prohibit the Fed from lending to insolvent financial institutions; require a “penalty rate” for borrowers that are using  a lending facility under Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act, which was the basis for the Fed to bail out some of the nation’s largest financial institutions that were deemed by the government as “too big to fail” with trillions in low-cost loans; establish criteria for determining if a lending facility is broad-based (facilities under Section 13(3) are required to have a minimum of five borrowers); require Congressional approval for those facilities that are not considered broad-based under the new criteria; and make reports available to the public in a timely manner (within 60 days).”Amidst the financial crisis of 2008, we witnessed the worst kinds of government cronyism when huge financial institutions were bailed out through section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act without much prudence or oversight,” Garrett said. “While Dodd-Frank promised to end the cycle of ‘too big to fail,’ all it did was codify this unfair practice into law and put the American taxpayers on the hook for untold billions—or even trillions—of dollars. I’m happy to introduce this bill with Representative Capuano to implement the systemic changes and Congressional oversight needed to ensure that the notoriously opaque Federal Reserve is held accountable to our constituents.”The bill introduced in the Senate last month, also called the Bailout Prevention Act, was sponsored by Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) and David Vitter (R-Louisiana).”America’s largest financial institutions received unprecedented assistance from the Federal Reserve during the crisis, much of it unknown to the Congress or public at the time,” Capuano said. “While the Dodd-Frank Act brought some reforms, the perception lingers that some financial institutions are simply too big to fail and could be bailed out again. This perception has consequences favoring the biggest players in the financial system. We may not know today what the next crisis will look like, but we all have a right to know the full extent of measures that may be taken to prevent a crisis. This legislation will help protect taxpayer dollars by increasing oversight of the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending powers and bringing much needed transparency to the process.” Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Bailouts Federal Reserve Too Big to Fail U.S. House of Representatives 2015-06-04 Brian Honea June 4, 2015 1,048 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Home / Daily Dose / Bipartisan Bill Introduced In Congress Aimed At Preventing Fed Bailouts Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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Low Defaults Anticipated to Bolster RMBS Performance

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Low Defaults Anticipated to Bolster RMBS Performance The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Could the Sale of Distressed Loans Decrease Foreclosures? Next: The Markets with the Highest Rental Rate Increases Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Kendall Baer is a Baylor University graduate with a degree in news editorial journalism and a minor in marketing. She is fluent in both English and Italian, and studied abroad in Florence, Italy. Apart from her work as a journalist, she has also managed professional associations such as Association of Corporate Counsel, Commercial Real Estate Women, American Immigration Lawyers Association, and Project Management Institute for Association Management Consultants in Houston, Texas. Born and raised in Texas, Baer now works as the online editor for DS News. Sign up for DS News Daily center_img December 6, 2016 1,188 Views Moody’s Investor Service RMBS 2016-12-06 Kendall Baer in Daily Dose, Featured, News About Author: Kendall Baer Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Low Defaults Anticipated to Bolster RMBS Performance Share Save All post-2010 RMBS are anticipated to have strong performance as pre-2010 RMBS weak performance gradually improves, according to Moody’s Investors Service 2017 RMBS Outlook. The report attributes this forecast to steady home price appreciation, low interest rates, and the furthering of standardized servicing.Moody’s forecasts that RMBS transactions will continue to improve due to prepayments and low defaults. The report also notes that single-family rental transactions’ performance is anticipated to remain stable. The report does expect that there is a potential for improvement among operators that could reduce operating expenses in these transactions, though.“Low default and steady prepayment rates will continue to bolster post-2010 RMBS performance, while RPL/NPL transactions will continue to benefit from low unemployment and rising wages in the coming year,” says Moody’s VP, Youriy Koudinov. “Similarly, robust demand for rental accommodation, rising home prices and strong interest alignment between SFR operators and bondholders will bolster the performance of SFR transactions.”The report states that Moody anticipates pre-2010 RMBS will experience a decline in new defaults and a stabilization of re-default rates on previously modified loans.“Any credit profile improvement will be deal-specific because generally improving credit performance will be offset by increased performance volatility stemming from a declining number of loans backing the transactions,” says the report. “Lower default rates and generally steady-to-declining loss severity rates will in most cases bolster the recoveries on senior bonds first, and on subordinated bonds in the long run.”Further the report notes that tail risk is also declining as transactions age and remaining borrowers prove their ability to make payments. Moody says that this reduces their likelihood of default.“As stronger borrowers repaid earlier, weaker borrowers remained in the pools,” adds the report. “However, by now, remaining borrowers who have stayed current on their mortgage payments since issuance or after modification have demonstrated a strong commitment to home ownership through the housing crisis.”To view the full 2017 RMBS Outlook, click HERE. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post Tagged with: Moody’s Investor Service RMBSlast_img read more

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[Breaking] SC To Pronounce Sentence In Contempt Case Against Prashant Bhushan On August 31

first_imgTop Stories[Breaking] SC To Pronounce Sentence In Contempt Case Against Prashant Bhushan On August 31 LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK29 Aug 2020 6:21 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court will pronounce on Monday(August 31) the sentence in the contempt case against Advocate Prashant Bhushan. On Aug 25, a bench headed by Justice Arun Mishra had reserved orders on the sentence in the contempt case over two tweets of Bhushan, after he refused to apologize.During the hearing, Justice Arun Mishra expressed disappointment at Bhushan issuing a…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court will pronounce on Monday(August 31) the sentence in the contempt case against Advocate Prashant Bhushan. On Aug 25, a bench headed by Justice Arun Mishra had reserved orders on the sentence in the contempt case over two tweets of Bhushan, after he refused to apologize.During the hearing, Justice Arun Mishra expressed disappointment at Bhushan issuing a supplementary statement to justify his tweets after asserting his disinclination to tender apology.”Tells us, what is wrong in using the word ‘apology’? What is wrong in seeking apology? Will that be reflection of the guilty? Apology is a magical word, which can heal many things. I am talking generally and not about Prashant. You will go to the category of Mahatma Ganghi, if you apologise. Gandhiji used to do that. If you have hurt anybody, you must apply balm. One should not feel belittled by that”, observed Justice Mishra while reserving orders on sentence.Senior Advocate Rajeev Dhavan, Bhushan’s counsel, submitted that he was not seeking the mercy of the court and was seeking “judicial statesmanship”.Dhavan also submitted that punishing Bhushan will make him a “martyr”.The Attorney General for India, K K Venugopal, requested the bench to not punish Bhushan and to let him off after a reprimand or a warning. On the last day for tendering an apology, Bhushan filed a statement in SC stating that an apology would be a “contempt of his conscience”. He stressed that as an officer of the court, he has a duty to “speak up” when he believes that the Judicial institution is deviating from its sterling record. “Therefore I expressed myself in good faith, not to malign the Supreme Court or any particular Chief Justice, but to offer constructive criticism so that the court can arrest any drift away from its long-standing role as a guardian of the Constitution and custodian of peoples’ rights,” he said. “My tweets represented this bonafide belief that I continue to hold. Public expression of these beliefs was I believe, in line with my higher obligations as a citizen and a loyal officer of this court. Therefore, an apology for expression of these beliefs, conditional or unconditional, would be insincere”, his statement read. He stressed that an apology cannot be a “mere incantation” but has to be made sincerely. “This is especially so when I have made the statements bonafide and pleaded truths with full details, which have not been dealt with by the Court. If I retract a statement before this court that I otherwise believe to be true or offer an insincere apology, that in my eyes would amount to the contempt of my conscience and of an institution that I hold in highest esteem,” the affidavit filed through Advocate Kamini Jaiswal read. He added, “I believe that the Supreme Court is the last bastion of hope for the protection of fundamental rights, the watchdog institutions and indeed for constitutional democracy itself. It has rightly been called the most powerful court in the democratic world, and often an exemplar for courts across the globe. Today in these troubling times, the hopes of the people of India vest in this Court to ensure the rule of law and the Constitution and not an untrammeled rule of the executive.” He said he read the SC order dated August 20 where he was asked to reconsider his statements with “deep regret” and responded thus “I have never stood on ceremony when it comes to offering an apology for any mistake or wrongdoing on my part. It has been a privilege for me to have served this institution and bring several important public interest causes before it. I live with the realization that I have received from this institution much more than I have had the opportunity to give it. I cannot but have the highest regard for the institution of the Supreme Court.” On August 14, a 3-judge bench of the Supreme Court had held Bhushan guilty of contempt of court for his tweets against the SC and the Chief Justices of India. During the hearing on the sentence held on August 20, Bhushan affirmed his comments and made a statement justifying his comments and expressed dismay at the Court verdict. “My tweets were nothing but a small attempt to discharge what I considered to be my highest duty at this juncture in the history of our republic. I did not tweet in a fit of absence mindedness. It would be insincere and contemptuous on my part to offer an apology for the tweets that expressed what was and continues to be my bonafide belief. Therefore, I can only humbly paraphrase what the father of the nation Mahatma Gandhi had said in his trial: I do not ask for mercy. I do not appeal to magnanimity. I am here, therefore, to cheerfully submit to any penalty that can lawfully be inflicted upon me for what the Court has determined to be an offence, and what appears to me to be the highest duty of a citizen.”, Bhushan said. The bench was not appreciative of the statement and asked Bhushan if he would like to reconsider it. The bench also asked Attorney General about granting time to Bhushan to reconsider the statement. AG agreed that time can be given to him. However, Bhushan stood by the statement and said that it was “well considered and well thought of”. He said that granting time “will not serve any purpose” as “it was unlikely” that he will change it. Nevertheless, the bench said that it will give him two or three days for him to reconsider the statement, and posted the matter for hearing on August 25.It was on July 22 that the bench headed by Justice Arun Mishra issued contempt notice to Bhushan in a suo moto case taken with respect to two of his tweets on judiciary and the Chief Justice of India.The bench, also including Justices B R Gavai and Krishna Murari, prima facie, observed that his tweets “have brought disrepute to the administration of justice and are capable of undermining the dignity and authority of the Supreme Court in general and the office of the Chief Justice of India in particular, in the eyes of general public”.Read the SC order issuing contempt notice to Prashant Bhushan @pbhushan1 taking cognizance of his tweets. The Court said the tweets prima face “brought administration of justice into disrepute and are capable of undermining the dignity and authority of SC and office of CJI” https://t.co/If40NujWjm pic.twitter.com/i6AcgcMTWJ— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) July 22, 2020  Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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DCC assessing ‘treacherous’ steps at Beechwood

first_img Twitter Facebook Pinterest DCC assessing ‘treacherous’ steps at Beechwood Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+ By News Highland – April 27, 2019 WhatsApp AudioHomepage BannerNews Donegal County Council is currently assessing what’s been described as a treacherous set of steps in Letterkenny with view towards providing a handrail there.It follows concerns raised by residents over how unsafe the steps, located between Beechwood Road and Beechwood Park are during bad weather.Cllr Jimmy Kavanagh says the route is used regularly, particularly by elderly people who are finding it difficult to access the steps in frosty conditions.He’s hopeful that the Council will address the issue in the coming weeks:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/jimmyrailingsat.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Previous articleLetterkenny dumping issue referred to litter warden departmentNext articleÚdarás na Gaeltachta defend fur farm funding allocation News Highland center_img Pinterest WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Harps come back to win in Waterford RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitterlast_img read more

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The microphysics of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula – Part 2: modelling aspects within Polar WRF

first_imgThe first intercomparisons of cloud microphysics schemes implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale atmospheric model (version 3.5.1) are performed in the Antarctic Peninsula using the polar version of WRF (Polar WRF) at 5 km resolution, along with comparisons to the British Antarctic Survey’s aircraft measurements (presented in Part 1 of this work, Lachlan-Cope et al., 2016). This study follows previous works suggesting the misrepresentation of the cloud thermodynamic phase in order to explain large radiative biases derived at the surface in Polar WRF continent-wide, and in the Polar WRF-based operational forecast model Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) over the Larsen C Ice shelf. Several cloud microphysics schemes are investigated: the WRF Single-Moment 5-class scheme (WSM5), the WRF Double-Moment 6-class scheme (WDM6), the Morrison double-moment scheme, the Thompson scheme, and the Milbrandt- Yau Double-Moment 7-class scheme. WSM5 used in AMPS struggles the most to capture the observed supercooled liquid phase mainly because of their ice nuclei parameterisation overestimating the number of activated crystals, while other micro- physics schemes (but not WSM5’s upgraded version, WDM6) manage much better to do so. The best performing scheme is the Morrison scheme for its better average prediction of occurrences of clouds, and cloud phase, as well as its lowest surface radiative bias over the Larsen C ice shelf in the infrared. This is important for surface energy budget consideration with Polar WRF since the cloud radiative effect is more pronounced in the infrared over icy surfaces. However, our investigation shows that all the schemes fail at simulating the supercooled liquid mass at some temperatures (altitudes) where observations show evidence of its persistence. An ice nuclei parameterisation relying on both temperature and aerosol content like DeMott et al. (2010) (not currently used in WRF cloud schemes) is in best agreement with the observations, at temperatures and aerosol concentration characteristic of the Antarctic Peninsula where the primary ice production occurs (Part 1), compared to parame- terisation only relying on the atmospheric temperature (used by the WRF cloud schemes). Overall, a realistic ice microphysics implementation is paramount to the correct representation of the supercooled liquid phase in Antarctic clouds.last_img read more

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